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dc.contributor.authorWiddup, K. H.en
dc.contributor.authorPurves, R. G.en
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Alistairen
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Richard J.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-20T22:08:33Z
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationWiddup, K. H., Purves, R. G., Black, A. D., Jarvis, P. & Lucas, R. J. (2001). Nitrogen fixation by caucasian clover and white clover in irrigated ryegrass pastures. Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 63, 171–175.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4573
dc.description.abstractThe N₂ fixation ability of caucasian clover was compared with that of white clover in irrigated ryegrass pastures over years 2 and 3 of a grazing experiment, using the ¹⁵N enrichment technique. ‘Endura’ caucasian clover was inoculated with the specific Rhizobium strain ICC148. The N concentration in clover herbage and the proportion of clover N derived from N₂ fixation (PN) were similar for both clovers at averages of 4.6%N and 50–60% respectively over the 2 years. The amount of N₂ fixed per hectare was directly related to the amount of clover dry matter (DM) produced by the two clover species. Caucasian clover produced four times the DM yield of white clover in year 2 (5400 cf. 1450 kg DM/ha) and four times the amount of N₂ fixed in herbage (136 cf. 36 kg N/ ha). In year 3, caucasian clover produced 50% more clover DM (3450 cf. 2370 kg DM/ha) and N₂ fixed (98 cf. 66 kg N/ha) than white clover. The increased N input from caucasian clover increased grass %N and N uptake from soil in caucasian clover pastures resulting in higher total pasture production compared with white clover pastures (15.7 cf. 14.2 t DM/ha) by year 3. In this study, caucasian clover demonstrated greater potential than white clover to meet the N demands of high-yielding perennial ryegrass in an intensive pastoral system.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge funding from the Struthers Trust for the development of the grazing experiment at Lincoln University and FRST funding for provision of ¹⁶N and N analyses. We thank the C. Alma Baker and Struthers Trusts for providing A.D. Black with financial support from post-graduate scholarships.en
dc.format.extent171-175en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.source63rd conference of the New Zealand Grassland Associationen
dc.subjectT. repensen
dc.subjectTrifolium ambiguumen
dc.subjectpasture productionen
dc.subjectnitrogen fixationen
dc.subjectLolium perenneen
dc.subjectclover contenten
dc.titleNitrogen fixation by caucasian clover and white clover in irrigated ryegrass pasturesen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
pubs.finish-date2001-11-01en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 63rd conference of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 30 October - 1 November 2001, Waikato.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2001-10-30en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1666-762X
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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