Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGoh, Kuan M.en
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, M. L.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-17T23:34:52Z
dc.date.issued1990en
dc.identifier.citationGoh, K. M. & Nguyen, M. L. (1990). Effects of grazing animals on the plant availability of sulphur fertilisers in grazed pastures. Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 52, 181-185.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4694
dc.description.abstractMost field trials conducted in New Zealand for assessing pasture plant sulphur (S) requirements use the mowing and clipping return technique without the inclusion of grazing animals. A rotational grazing experiment and a field plot trial were conducted on a Templeton silt loam soil (Udic Ustochrept) in Canterbury using radioactive ³⁵S-labelled fertilisers to examine the effects of grazed sheep on the plant availability and cycling of applied S fertilisers. An additional plot trial was conducted to determine leaching losses of ³⁵S-labelled urine applied to pastures. The results obtained showed that maximum ³⁵S concentration in pastures treated with elemental S occurred 3 months earlier in the grazed trials compared with that of ungrazed plots. This increased herbage S was also reflected in the wool ³⁵S of ewes which grazed the pastures. In addition, the amount of residual elemental S remaining in the soil after 3 months of its application was significantly lower in grazed than in ungrazed pastures. These results suggest that grazing animals enhanced the plant availability of elemental S probably because of the effects of animal trampling and the return of animal faeces. It was also found that about 36-44% of the applied ³⁵S fertilisers and up to 68% of the applied urinary ³⁵5 were not recovered in the soil within one growing season in the field. Thus grazing animals enhanced not only the availability of elemental S, but were also responsible for substantial losses of S from pastures through animal excreta. The present data suggest that field trial results obtained from mowing plot trials without the inclusion of grazing animals are unlikely to assess adequately the plant availability of elemental S.en
dc.description.sponsorshipMAF Technology, Lincoln University Research Committee and the Vernon Willey Trust.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.subjectelemental sulphuren
dc.subjectoxidationen
dc.subjectsheep grazingen
dc.subjectmowingen
dc.subjectgrazingen
dc.subjectsulphuren
dc.subjectnutrient cyclingen
dc.subjecturineen
dc.subjectsulphur leachingen
dc.subjectrecoveryen
dc.subjectfertiliseren
dc.titleEffects of grazing animals on the plant availability of sulphur fertilisers in grazed pasturesen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 52nd New Zealand Grassland Association Conference, 30 October - 1 November 1990, Ashburton.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record