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dc.contributor.authorJones, Barry D.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-23T23:09:32Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4711
dc.description.abstractThe strategic importance of submarines from a defence perspective is generally well understood by the public and notwithstanding the secrecy surrounding their activities, they have featured in numerous newspaper articles, magazines and books. In August 1958, the world's first nuclear powered submarine Nautilus traversed the North Pole under the Arctic ice. Just seven months later, the Skate surfaced precisely at the North Pole. These remarkable achievements brought dramatically into focus the new-found capability of submarines powered by marine nuclear reactors, and for the first time, translated the autonomous submarine of Jules Verne's science fiction, into science fact. What is not well known or understood is the use of underwater vessels to carry cargo either in a strategic military role, or in a purely commercial one. To that end, a number of proposals, business cases, and studies have been conducted over the years claiming the economic and strategic benefits of using submarines for that purpose. In order to put this question into context, maritime shipping in its simplest form consists of transporting goods and services from A to B by the most economical route at the least possible cost. Therefore, any measures that would produce either a feasible route, a shorter route, or a more cost-effective route are all worthy of study. In the last two decades, energy savings in the maritime transport sector both from an economic and an environmental point of view have become more apparent and have taken on greater significance. In terms of energy efficiency, true submarines for example can take advantage of routes which are not available to surface vessels, such as below the Arctic icecap. It is conservatively estimated, that such a route could reduce the passage time between Japan and Europe by more than twelve days. Also, submarines could feasibly be used on routes in the Baltic and parts of the Black Sea, North Russia and Alaska and other areas that are perennially ice-bound. This dissertation provides a general historical outline of this aspect of submarine use for carrying cargo and looks critically at this mode of transport in contrast to conventional surface vessels.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectArcticen
dc.subjectcargo vesselsen
dc.subjectenergyen
dc.subjectfuel cellen
dc.subjecthistoryen
dc.subjecticebreakeren
dc.subjecticecapen
dc.subjectNorth Poleen
dc.subjectnuclearen
dc.subjectoilen
dc.subjectpropulsionen
dc.subjectshipen
dc.subjectsubmersibleen
dc.subjectsemi-submersibleen
dc.subjecttransport submarinesen
dc.subjectsurfaceen
dc.subjectfuture transporten
dc.subjectunderwateren
dc.titleSubmarine cargo vessels : opportunities for future transporten
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Professional Studiesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMANen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMAN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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