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dc.contributor.authorStark, Christine H. E.en
dc.contributor.authorCondron, Leo M.en
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Alisonen
dc.contributor.authorDi, Hong J.en
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, M.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-13T01:07:18Z
dc.date.issued2007-06en
dc.identifier.citationStark, C., Condron, L. M., Stewart, A., Di, H. J., & O'Callaghan, M. (2007). Effects of past and current crop management on soil microbial biomass and activity. Biology and Fertility of Soils, 43(5), 531-540.en
dc.identifier.issn0178-2762en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/473
dc.description.abstractBecause soil biota is influenced by a number of factors, including land use and management techniques, changing management practices could have significant effects on the soil microbial properties and processes. An experiment was conducted to investigate differences in soil microbiological properties caused by long- and short-term management practices. Intact monolith lysimeters (0.2 m² surface area) were taken from two sites of the same soil type that had been under long-term organic or conventional crop management and were then subjected to the same 2.5-year crop rotation [winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), maize (Zea mais L.), lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.), and rape (Brassica napus L. ssp. oleifera)] and two fertilizer regimes (following common organic and conventional practices). Soil samples were taken after crop harvest and analyzed for microbial biomass C and N, microbial activity (fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis, arginine deaminase activity, and dehydrogenase activity), and total C and N. The incorporation of the green manure stimulated growth and activity of the microbial communities in soils of both management histories. Soil microbial properties did not show any differences between organically and conventionally fertilized soils, indicating that crop rotation and plant type had a larger influence on the microbial biomass and enzyme activities than fertilization. Initial differences in microbial biomass declined, while the effects of farm management history were still evident in enzyme activities and total C and N. Links between enzyme activities and microbial biomass C varied depending on treatment, indicating differences in microbial community composition.en
dc.format.extent531-540en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Berlin / Heidelbergen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Springer Berlin / Heidelberg - http://springerlink.com/content/w43336j213958645/en
dc.rightsCopyright © Springer-Verlag 2006en
dc.subjectlinkageen
dc.subjectpast and current managementen
dc.subjectgreen manureen
dc.subjectintact monolith lysimetersen
dc.subjectsoil microbial biomassen
dc.subjectmicrobial activityen
dc.subjectlinkagesen
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.titleEffects of past and current crop management on soil microbial biomass and activityen
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300100 Soil and Water Sciences::300102 Soil biologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
dc.relation.isPartOfBiology and Fertility of Soilsen
pubs.issue5en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://springerlink.com/content/w43336j213958645/en
pubs.volume43en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-9282-4063
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3082-994X
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-6966-0299


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