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dc.contributor.authorDewerse, Joanne R.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-12T22:23:39Z
dc.date.issued1996en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4756
dc.description.abstractThe mainstream development process has become an ideology in its own right, and its principles and practice are internationally accepted. They are not, however, universally beneficial. In developing countries women especially suffer disproportionately the negative effects of development. While development planners and policy makers attempt to change this by including women in their projects, alternative development activists maintain that the very structures of mainstream development uphold gender, racial and class inequality. The literature review is an exploration of the key criticisms of alternative development activists, particularly Third World feminists, and the principles of alternative strategies they propose. Self-empowerment is the primary principle for Third World women to gain equitable development. How can the self-empowerment principle work for women? This monograph is a biographical sketch of twenty single heads of households in Altanbulag somon, Mongolia. Mongolia is a country in transition from a command to an open economy. Privatisation has been the primary focus of the transition strategy, and one of the most disturbing results has been widespread poverty of a scale not previously known. Poverty levels are higher in the rural population, and among women. Single headed households are also represented disproportionately below the official poverty line. All interviewees are living in difficult circumstances, over half of the households living on or below the official poverty line. Most struggle to meet basic needs and some are completely dependent upon the charity of neighbours for survival. Unemployment, high dependency upon the state or family members, and isolation are significant aspects of these people's lives. Based on my interpretation of the interview results, any women's collective action for change will need to address issues of women's legal status, particularly that offemale household heads; gaining a political voice; women's physical isolation; solidarity and employment; a careful and just identification of the poor; the government's awareness of the needs of the poor; and becoming a cohesive force for change. This work does not set out to give advice or to make recommendations. It does show the potential for research to support and collaborate with women for change. More work needs to be done on women's collective response to poverty, their collective action for change, and the unfolding of indigenous development strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectpovertyen
dc.subjectindigenous developmenten
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectrural developmenten
dc.subjectdeveloping countriesen
dc.subjectMongoliaen
dc.titleFemale-headed household in Altanbulag Somon : a biographical sketchen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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