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dc.contributor.authorGalway, Kylie E.en
dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Richard P.en
dc.contributor.authorSyrett, P.en
dc.contributor.authorEmberson, Rowan M.en
dc.contributor.authorShephard, A.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T04:14:10Z
dc.date.issued2003en
dc.identifier.citationGalway, K. E., Duncan, R. P., Syrett, P., Emberson, R. M., & Sheppard, A. W. (2004). Insect performance and host-plant stress: A review from a biological control perspective. In J. M. Cullen, D. T. Briese, D. J. Kriticos, W. M. Lonsdale, L. Morin & J. K. Scott (Eds.), Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds: Canberra, Australia, 27 April - 2 May 2003 (pp. 394-399). Canberra, Australia: CSIRO Entomology.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/491
dc.description.abstractThree hypotheses predict how insect herbivores perform on stressed host plants. The plant stress hypothesis (PSH) predicts improved insect performance on stressed hosts. The plant vigour hypothesis (PVH) predicts that insects closely associated with their host, such as gall-formers, will perform better on vigorously growing non-stressed hosts. The third hypothesis, the Insect Performance Hypothesis (IPH) predicts that wood-feeders, sap-feeders and miners will perform better on stressed hosts, while leaf-feeders and gall-formers will perform better on non-stressed hosts. These hypotheses were developed, however, without separating different types of plant stress. In this review we tested these hypotheses across five insect feeding-guilds and twelve host-plant stress types, from more than 200 published studies on insect performance. When all host-plant stress types were pooled, the results suggested wood, sap and leaf-feeders performed better on stressed host plants, while miners and gall-formers performed better on non-stressed host plants, thus supporting the PVH. However, when all insect feeding-guilds were pooled, it was found that host-plant-stress type also influenced insect performance, which was generally higher when host plants were growing under reduced moisture, light or CO₂, increased soil nitrogen or on younger plants. When host-plant-stress type and insect feeding-guild were separated, it was found that insect performance across feeding guilds varied with the type of host-plant stress encountered suggesting that insects in different feeding guilds may respond to different physiological and morphological changes in the plant. This review highlights the fact that insect performance is often significantly affected by host-plant stress, but that the direction of the response is variable. Although this review did not fully support any of the three theoretical hypotheses tested, there were consistent relationships between some insect-feeding guilds and host-plant-stress types that would allow the prediction on whether a specific biological control agent might perform better under a specific host-plant stress.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCSIRO Entomologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © CSIRO 2004en
dc.sourceXI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weedsen
dc.subjectenvironmental stressen
dc.subjectinsect performance hypothesisen
dc.subjectinsect plant interactionsen
dc.subjectplant stress hypothesisen
dc.subjectplant vigour hypothesisen
dc.titleInsect performance and host-plant stress: a review from a biological control perspectiveen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Unpublished
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology::270505 Entomologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
lu.contributor.unitSoil, Plants and Ecological Sciencesen
pubs.finish-date2003-05-02en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds, Canberra, Australia, 27 April - 2 May 2003.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/SPES
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2003-04-27en
lu.subtypeConference Oral Presentationen


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