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dc.contributor.authorHaines Melanie, L.en
dc.contributor.authorSyrett Paulineen
dc.contributor.authorEmberson Rowan, M.en
dc.contributor.authorWithers Toni, M.en
dc.contributor.authorFowler Simon, V.en
dc.contributor.authorWorner Sue, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-05-20T04:26:22Z
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifier.citationHaines, M. L., Syrett, P., Emberson, R. M., Withers, T. M., Fowler, S. V., & Worner, S. P. (2004). Ruling out a host-range expansion as the cause of the unpredicted non-target attack on tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) by Bruchidius villosus. In J. M. Cullen, D. T. Briese, D. J. Kriticos, W. M. Lonsdale, L. Morin & J. K. Scott (Eds.), Proceedings of the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds: Canberra, Australia, 27 April - 2 May 2003 (pp. 271-276). Canberra, Australia: CSIRO Entomology.en
dc.identifier.isbn0643069488en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/492
dc.description.abstractScotch broom (Cytisus scoparius) is a woody shrub of European origin that is an invasive weed in New Zealand. Bruchidius villosus was released in New Zealand in 1986 as a biological control agent of Scotch broom, after tests indicated that it was specific to this species. However, in 1999, B. villosus was discovered developing in the seeds of an unpredicted host, tagasaste or tree lucerne (Chamaecytisus proliferus). Although the original choice tests carried out in quarantine failed to predict acceptance of C. proliferus by ovipositing females, the current population in New Zealand clearly finds this species an acceptable host. An investigation of the original host-testing procedures revealed a number of possible limitations in the tests conducted in the 1980s. Concerns that a host-range expansion might have occurred in a weed biological control agent led to this study in which beetles from the original population (Silwood Park, United Kingdom) were reimported and the original handling and host choice tests were replicated. Despite showing a strong preference for Scotch broom, the beetles tested in this study accepted C. proliferus for oviposition. These results allow us to rule out the possibility that a hostrange expansion has occurred.en
dc.format.extent271-276en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCSIRO Entomologyen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - CSIRO Entomologyen
dc.rightsCopyright © CSIRO 2004en
dc.sourceXI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weedsen
dc.subjectBruchidius villosusen
dc.subjectChamaecytisus proliferusen
dc.subjectCytisus scopariusen
dc.subjecthost-range expansionen
dc.subjecthost-specificity testingen
dc.titleRuling out a host-range expansion as the cause of the unpredicted non-target attack on tagasaste (Chamaecytisus proliferus) by Bruchidius villosusen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::270000 Biological Sciences::270500 Zoology::270505 Entomologyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
lu.contributor.unitBio-Protection Research Centreen
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weedsen
pubs.finish-date2003-05-02en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the XI International Symposium on Biological Control of Weeds, Canberra, Australia, 27 April - 2 May 2003.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/BPRC
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2003-04-27en
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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