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dc.contributor.authorMills, H. L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-15T22:06:21Z
dc.date.available2012-10-15T22:06:21Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4970
dc.description.abstractIndustrialised nations have become "throwaway" societies where little is reused and the problem of waste disposal is escalating. Due to a small population and relatively large area available for disposal this problem has only recently been recognised in New Zealand, and the need for waste minimisation identified. The aim of this study is to identify waste minimisation initiatives to reduce solid waste disposed of to landfill in the Buller District, investigate these and to develop a strategy to educate Buller residents about waste minimisation. Six objectives were set to meet this aim. Buller District, on the West Coast of New Zealand, currently has limited waste minimisation opportunities but this is likely to change due to regulatory and resource consents requirements and the commitment of the council to a target of zero waste by joining the National Zero Waste Pilot Project. District characteristics such as population size and distribution, resources and support all place restrictions on waste minimisation success and must be examined when developing a waste minimisation plan. Considering these and other factors a plan with a specific goal of reducing waste to landfill and objectives has been identified, including education, home composting, vermicomposting, recycling and reuse and local market development. The West Coast Regional Council's role in relation to waste is education, however there is currently no formal education in this area. A survey performed as part of this study found that only 10% of respondents had a clear understanding of waste minimisation implying that education is needed. With the recent development of a draft Environmental education Strategy (EES), the role of the Regional Council in education is likely to change. A strategy was developed, based on the EES, focusing on educating the public about waste minimisation (including the "5 R's"), consequences of actions and organisations about Environmental Management Systems. These issues are becoming increasingly common in regulations, strategies and regional plans. The implementation of these recommendations will result in significant reductions in waste to landfills which may spread through the entire region. This is obviously of great benefit to the district, region and the New Zealand environment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectwaste minimisationen
dc.subjectenvironmental educationen
dc.subjectsolid wasteen
dc.subjectBuller Districten
dc.subjectWest Coast Regional Councilen
dc.subjectcompostingen
dc.subjectrecyclingen
dc.subjectreuseen
dc.subjectvermicompostingen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Management Systems (EMS)en
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleWaste minimisation and environmental education in the Buller Districten
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorDakers, Andrew
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050203 Environmental Education and Extensionen


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