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dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Matthew J.en
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-24T01:14:53Z
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/4989
dc.description.abstractAquaculture is the world's fastest growing primary industry. It is expected that by 2030 aquaculture will match the wild fisheries catch (SOFIA Report 2004). Aquaculture has been growing rapidly in New Zealand mostly through the commercial production of three species; greenshell mussels, king or chinook salmon and Pacific oysters. Within the New Zealand aquaculture industry the majority, around 70% of our production value is within the marine environment. Worldwide trends differ with only around 33% of the production value resulting from the marine environment. These ratios suggest that our freshwater/land-based aquaculture industry has yet to be fully utilized. There are two freshwater crayfish species endemic to New Zealand; these species are known as koura and have significant potential as a species for land-based aquaculture ventures. Currently, there is only one commercially viable koura farming operation in New Zealand. The demand for koura far exceeds the supply; farmers are struggling to meet domestic demand let alone any export potential. The growth of commercially viable crayfish industries in Louisiana, USA, Australia and elsewhere has provided a stimulus for this research into the factors affecting the growth of our own industry. Historically koura have been abundant in our streams and rivers and still are in several regions. However, given the increasing development of rural land for agriculture in particular diary farming and the demand for water resources it is difficult to determine with any certainty whether these wild populations will remain stable without conservation and further research. This research aims to address the potential of koura farming within the Canterbury region, by the use of case studyies to assess the factors affecting the growth of the industry at large. In particular; investigating the planning/legislative provisions for koura farming and by using two established koura farms as case studies to help identify issues for a S.W.O.T. (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) Analysis for the potential of further growth of the industry. The influence of the relevant stakeholders is also considered; the role of the Department of Conservation, Ministry of Fisheries, Local Iwi (Ngai Tahu), Local Authorities and their stance on koura farming is investigated. With little or no government assistance koura farming has developed from a backyard hobby into an enterprise with serious commercial potential. This research aims to highlight the potential of the koura industry and provides a basis for further discussion and research.en
dc.format.extent1-88en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectland based aquacultureen
dc.subjectParanephros planifronsen
dc.subjectParanephros zealandicusen
dc.subjectfreshwater crayfishen
dc.subjectkouraen
dc.subjectsustainable farmingen
dc.subjectfreshwater aquacultureen
dc.titleAssessing the potential of increased commercial scale Koura farming in the Canterbury regionen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DEM
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurchen


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