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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jean
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-31T19:59:06Z
dc.date.available2012-10-31T19:59:06Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5006
dc.description.abstractFeminist theory articulates a position that confronts dualisms and shows that entities previously seen as dichotomous - mind and body, reason and emotion, and culture and nature are neither separate nor separable. In relation to science, technology and environmental management, feminist analysis has focused on exposing how dichotomies are used to sanction and perpetuate domination of the side of the dualism considered to have less value than the other. While approaches vary, a feminist orientation within these fields of inquiry agrees that man-machine-nature discussions that ignore the female are incomplete. From such a standpoint, such approaches are seen to be short-sighted as they ignore the women-nature identification as well as the female-male dualism and its relationship to other dualisms. These must be incorporated into any analysis aimed at understanding the connections between them and working towards ending those dualistic relationships. Ecofeminism, theory and praxis which integrates perspectives from feminism and ecology has the potential for teasing out the links between the feminist and ecological critiques of domination. Ecofeminism provides insights to, and has the potential to eventually weaken the whole dualistic structure. An ecofeminist vision for environmental management is informed by the need to recognise the connections between all forms of domination, and is based upon the principles of holism, reciprocity and equality.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectfeminist epistemologiesen
dc.subjectenvironmental managementen
dc.subjectdualismen
dc.subjectecofeminismen
dc.titleFeminist perspectives on resource and environmental managementen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc220306 Feminist Theoryen
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen


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