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dc.contributor.authorHamlin, Stephenen
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-14T00:16:31Z
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5107
dc.description.abstractPacific Island countries have been unable to achieve self-sufficiency in meat from pastoral livestock. Livestock industries generally remain in a plateau of production despite many development projects supported by governments and international donors. This research analysed 30 projects that committed time and resources to aiding the growth of Pacific pastoral livestock industries. Most projects focused on technical and biological aspects of on-farm production, as well as training personnel on the same aspects. This was despite strong evidence found in the literature that many other aspects of industry are also vital to industry growth. The framework for analysis of livestock industries produced by this research included nine vital industry components. Seven of the nine industry components were underrepresented in the design of the past Pacific projects. This research took a practical approach to the problem by creating a tool aiming to make it easier for future project designers to analyse the entire scope of their Pacific livestock industry of interest. The tool was developed after formation of the framework for analysis to ensure all vital industry components were considered. The framework was contextualised by fleshing it out with understanding from within-industry data. This understanding was formed by analysing information elicited from key informants within the Samoan pastoral livestock industry. Literature addressing industry constraints was used to strengthen the analysis and understanding of the context. The research to develop the tool found that land tenure issues, availability of livestock, credit availability and return on investment all heavily influence the number of livestock the nation will carry. Genetics, expertise, sale prices along with many cultural specifics will influence the level of productivity of any livestock farm. These factors in turn are influenced by other factors which must also be understood. Government policy, livestock organisations and industry communication tend to influence the performance of the industry at many levels. The tool takes the form of a three page checklist consisting of questions for the user to probe the industry of interest. It can be used by development generalists. Use of the tool in the Pacific is likely to result in modifications which will increase its usefulness in certain contexts. This thesis stresses the journey ‘towards a tool’ for industry analysis because it should not be considered a finished product. Its primary attribute is to ensure an even-handed consideration of where resources should be applied. The tool is presented in this thesis along with guidelines, limitations and an illustration of its use.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectlivestocken
dc.subjectcattleen
dc.subjectsheepen
dc.subjectindustryen
dc.subjectPacificen
dc.subjectagricultureen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectproject designen
dc.titleTowards a tool for the analysis of developing pastoral livestock industries in the Pacific Islandsen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Land Management and Systemsen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/LAMS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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