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dc.contributor.authorAlexander, R. E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-13T23:32:30Z
dc.date.available2013-01-13T23:32:30Z
dc.date.issued1933
dc.identifier.citationAlexander, R. E. (1933). Pure versus mixed pastures for grazing. In Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 2.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5163
dc.description.abstractThis paper traces the history of British grassland farming. A perusal of the available accounts of early British farming indicates that the practice was to crop the land till it no longer carried payable crops, then to leave it to restore fertility by resting. Nothing was sown on it and the 'natural' herbage was allowed to grow at sweet will. This natural herbage consisted largely of weeds, and this may account for the complete and thorough distribution and accumulaticn of weeds and weed seeds in Biitish farm lands.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.relationAvailable at www.grassland.org.nzen
dc.relation.urihttp://www.grassland.org.nz/viewpublication.php?pubID=87en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors and New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.subjectpastureen
dc.subjectgrazingen
dc.subjectgrassland farmingen
dc.titlePure versus mixed pastures for grazingen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Publisheden
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc070305 Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)en
lu.subtypeConference Paper


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