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dc.contributor.authorDalziel, Paul C.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-27T23:18:11Z
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5266
dc.description.abstractFor the last five years the author has been involved in a five-year trans-disciplinary research program funded by the New Zealand government on education employment linkages for young people. His research has focused on employer-led channels at the regional level, investigating how opportunities and requirements of employers in a region are communicated to young people as they make key education choices. This paper summarises the major findings of this part of the research programme, paying particular attention to the role of careers offices in post-school education institutions. The work draws on the skill ecosystem metaphor introduced initially by David Finegold (1999) and developed more recently by the NSW Board of Vocational Education and Training in Australia in collaboration with a research team led by John Buchanan at the University of Sydneyen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/5266en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAERU miscellaneous publicationsen
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectskill ecosystemen
dc.subjecttransitionen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectcareer guidanceen
dc.subjecteducation employment linkagesen
dc.titleRegional skill ecosystems to assist young people making education employment linkages in transition from school to worken
dc.typeMonograph
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
pubs.notesThis paper was prepared for presentation at the North American Regional Science Council conference, Ottawa, 7-10 November 2012, and at the Australia and New Zealand Regional Science Association International conference, Wollongong, 4-7 December 2012.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/5266en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1757-6888


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