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dc.contributor.authorSelby-Neal, Rochelle M.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-15T01:29:40Z
dc.date.available2013-03-15T01:29:40Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5285
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to question and reflect upon the human involvement in whale stranding rescues. The overall question considered in this study was, should New Zealanders be rescuing stranded whales, and if so, is the current management approach of the Department of Conservation (DOC) appropriate? To answer this question the 'human-whale' relationship was analysed from a historical perspective through the agenda-setting process, and through an investigation of the characteristics of whales that appeal to humans. Theory relating to human treatment of animals was used to gain an understanding of the motivation behind whale rescues. This study concluded that New Zealanders can justifiably continue to rescue stranded whales from a moral and ecological ethics perspective. This study then identified and highlighted the major issues when the whale stranding rescue response is analysed in the context of conservation, as administered by DOC. This study concluded that changes are required to DOC's management approach. These changes should reduce the opportunity costs to conservation, increase benefits through not only public relations, but also conservation awareness, and create a commitment to whale stranding rescues at an institutional level rather than through public, individual staff or non-governmental organisation pressures or alternatively, consider contracting the responsibility to other organisations. This study of whale stranding rescues highlights the need to insure that both anthropomorphic and ecological values are balanced in resource management, and the difficulty in achieving this 'balance'.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectwhale strandingen
dc.subjectDepartment of Conservation (DOC)en
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.subjectecological valuesen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.titleWhale stranding rescues : a contribution to conservation?en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorHughey, Kenneth
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can only be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050204 Environmental Impact Assessmenten


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