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dc.contributor.authorPaterson, L. M.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-18T01:09:58Z
dc.date.available2013-03-18T01:09:58Z
dc.date.issued1979
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5288
dc.description.abstractThis project examines land of high values for food production as a resource and the conflicts in its use. Rather than accept that there is a resource management problem and proceeding to formulate a resource management strategy the project deals with the initial stages of the resource management approach. A complete picture of the resource is attempted on which the approach can go further and produce a resource management plan. Definition of the resource is not found to be simple, as it is a subjective concept. There must be an attempt to define the resource on a more empirical basis. The factors acting on the resource are identified and several examples of interactions and interdependencies between factors and other resources are given. Different sectors and levels of planning are found to have a wide range of attitudes to the resource, depending on certain characteristics such as: standard of living, lifestyle, level of education, aims and interests in life and knowledge of the resource. Specific attitudes to the resource are hard to define, but there are basically two opposing views towards highly productive land. On the one hand are those who do not want to see agricultural land used for anything other than food production and on the other hand are those who consider the market prices indicate the socially efficient allocation of highly productive land. Protection of land of high value for food production is considered a matter of national importance and in general the legislation is considered adequate to provide for the protection of the resource. It is the mechanisms for implementation which are a matter of concern. One major conflict in use is recognised for highly productive land, i.e. food production vs settlement. A positive planning approach is recommended to provide for the needs and aspirations of all sectors of society. Encouraging the wise use of land is considered preferable to using totally restrictive planning controls. Planning for the use of resources of national importance, such as land of high value for food production is shown to involve all levels of planning, as all levels of interest are effected. The relation between the planning levels is of great concern as the strength of the links will have a large bearing on the success of planning. The main conflict of interests is shown to be between national and local levels, which are at extreme ends of the continuum of interests. The basis of this conflict lies primarily with the difference in time perspective of issues. Suggestions are made on steps to avoid conflicts, such as more exchange of information and attitudes between levels and wider dissemination of resource data. Throughout the study the impediments to effective resource management are identified. These include gaps in resource data, no definition of public interest and conflicts between levels of planning. It is not until there is a complete picture of what is happening to the resource that a resource management strategy can be devised. Incomplete data for decision-making at these early stages is serious as urban development decisions are virtually irreversible.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectland useen
dc.subjectfood productionen
dc.subjectresource managementen
dc.subjectproductive landen
dc.subjecthigh valueen
dc.subjectdecision makingen
dc.titleLand of high value for food production as a resource and the conflicts in its useen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorAckley, Ken
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc050205 Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc140205 Environment and Resource Economicsen


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