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dc.contributor.authorSchoenberg, Trina L.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-19T02:14:00Z
dc.date.issued2000en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5291
dc.description.abstractBackcountry recreation opportunities for people with disabilities have historically been few or non-existent. There is little research on the demand or provision for these kind of recreation opportunities for people with disabilities. Normalisation theory charges that people with disabilities have the right to normal recreation opportunities, no matter what their ability. This choice should include access to a variety of walking tracks accessible to the general population. This study sought to determine the wheelchair accessibility of tracks in one particular region of New Zealand, the Haast, as a case study to determine whether people with physical disabilities have access to backcountry opportunities. Data were collected using a Truemeter measuring device and the Kiwi Track grading system to determine the accessibility of tracks. Results were based on length, grade, surface of the tracks and overall accessibility. It was found that there is relatively little backcountry track opportunity for people with disabilities who use wheelchairs due to the lack of variety in length of tracks and obstacles which prevent people with physical disabilities from using the tracks, suggesting that people who use wheelchairs do not have normal access to tracks in the Haast region.en
dc.formatvi, 68 pages
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectbackcountry recreationen
dc.subjectaccessibilityen
dc.subjectwalking tracksen
dc.subjectequal rightsen
dc.subjectleisure servicesen
dc.subjectdisabilitiesen
dc.subjectlegislationen
dc.subjectintegrateden
dc.titleNormalisation and track accessibility for people with disabilities in the Haast : a dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Science at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can only be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden


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