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dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline M.en
dc.contributor.authorKaye Blake, W.en
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Rachelen
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-12T00:47:31Z
dc.date.issued2010-03en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5340
dc.description.abstractThe most frequently quoted and perhaps most widely accepted definition of sustainable development is the one articulated by the Bruntland Commission – development that ‘seeks to meet the needs and aspirations of the present without compromising [the] ability to meet those of the future’ (WCED 1987, p. 43). Various disciplines have addressed the interpretation of sustainability in very broad terms. It is not uncommon, for example, to distinguish ‘social sustainability’, ‘cultural sustainability’, ‘environmental sustainability’, and of course ‘economic sustainability’. Social sustainability includes key concepts such as resilient communities, sustainable livelihoods, and access to core services of education and health. Cultural sustainability includes language, values and cultural aspirations. Environmental and economic sustainability are key concepts in this paper and are presented in more detail below. Four decades into talks and negotiations over ‘sustainable development’ as a planetary aim, and there still remain two key challenges in moving sustainable development from concept to action. One, the broad range of interpretations of the term and two, somewhat connected to the first, is the lack of reliable tools of measurement that can provide an indication if we are moving in the right direction in achieving sustainability.en
dc.format.extent2-25en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/5340en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors.en
dc.source84th Annual Conference of the Agricultural Economics Societyen
dc.subjectagriculturalen
dc.subjectagricultural sustainabilityen
dc.subjectperformance indicatorsen
dc.subjectARGOS programmeen
dc.titleCapital based sustainability indicators as a possible way for measuring agricultural sustainabilityen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen
pubs.finish-date2010-03-30en
pubs.notesPaper presented at the 84th Annual Conference of the Agricultural Economics Society, Edinburgh, 29th to 31st March 2010. From original ARGOS research report ; no. 10/02.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/5340en
pubs.start-date2010-03-29en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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