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dc.contributor.authorLausterer, H. D.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T01:05:05Z
dc.date.available2013-04-16T01:05:05Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5352
dc.description.abstractThe everyday school-run contributes to a large extent to the rush-hour traffic in most developed countries, causing traffic and parking congestion, pollution and safety concerns outside most schools as well as annoyance to the surrounding residents. There has been an increasing trend for parents to drive their children to school and also students using their own cars thus aggravating the situation. The overall objective of this research was to find out about the transport mode and travel patterns of high school students in Christchurch and to assess if the current situation could be changed through improved transport management. Recommendations are given to identify how school transport could be influenced towards more sustainable transport behaviour. An international literature review was compiled on the reasons leading to this modal shift and the effects of the shifts in transport patterns, as well as on measures to initiate a modal shift. A survey of approximately 1,200 students of six high schools was conducted to identify issues such as means of transportation, level of car or bike ownership, travel time, distance to school and attitudes towards a potential shift to soft modes of transport. The study provides data on current attitude patterns to the authorities that can be used as a basis for more efficient transport systems and infrastructure and assisting to develop new objectives, strategies and policies. The results of the behavioural assessment will support future policy making. The study revealed that the current behaviour and attitudes do not support the Councils' objectives of sustainable transport as 37% of the surveyed students use motor vehicles to get to school. The hard measures like restricted parking, improved and safer walking and cycling facilities and improved bus connections will contribute to a shift of modes. However, the soft methods such as education aiming at changed attitudes and behaviour are of main importance. They will only be effective if the government is prepared to set a serious trend, such as increasing the running costs of motor vehicles.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjecthigh school studentsen
dc.subjectschool transporten
dc.subjecttrafficen
dc.subjecttravel patternsen
dc.subjecttransport managementen
dc.subjecttransport modeen
dc.subjectsustainable transporten
dc.subjectroad safetyen
dc.titleMobility management for high school students in Christchurch, New Zealanden
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma in Transport Studiesen
lu.thesis.supervisorKissling, Chris
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. en
dc.subject.anzsrc120506 Transport Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studiesen


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