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dc.contributor.authorDowdell, Raymond J.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T22:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5361
dc.description.abstractIt has become apparent that the continued practice of "Lessons Learnt', a process adopted individually by participating nations and collectively by the United Nations (UN) to prevent repeating historical errors, has failed to serve its purpose. This is particularly evident in the area of 'counterpart training' and a lack of commonality or compatibility of equipments, leaving a legacy of unsupported donated equipment and procedures. Aid and nation re-building remains subjective and as yet a template has not been determined to avoid reliving the common mistakes in peace support/man-made disaster relief operations. Developing countries exist, here and now, amidst the very stark and tangible realities of the late 20th century. Developing countries must acknowledge these realities and accept that internal change must be in keeping with external influences if they are to have any hope of successful nation building. For those countries dependent on aid for basic survival, let alone progression and are spending more than they earn, with little other strategic value with which to bargain, structural adjustment is inescapable and unavoidable. The problem is that every shift in mainstream thought about what development is supposed to be, sooner or later is expressed in projects 'in the field' and the shape of such projects is influenced by the policies of the donor agencies or contributing countries. The fact that these policies change radically - sometimes over quite short time periods – means inevitably that there is a lack of coherence in the development drive. Rather than being a concerted and determined effort to achieve clear and agreed objectives across all participating nations, the resultant process is 'something that stops and starts, lurches forward and doubles back, kangaroo hops off in a particular direction one year and then veers off drunkenly in another the next.' East Timor may not be an exact model however, it is currently considered the most successful modern UN mission and as such, examining it will assist in preparing for future complex, multi-dimensional peace operation missions (Humes 2001). As a participant observer in the Peace Support and Nation Building process in East Timor, the opportunity presented itself to identify and address the fundamental failing points in post-conflict development. Organisational development, of structure, systems, personnel selection and training, infrastructure support, both donated equipment and resident skill and the monitoring and the documenting of progress, both during and post UN support. The suggested future actions to avoid repetition may not effect change in a sufficiently timely manner to influence current missions, however, they provide a course of action that if adopted, may change the outcomes of future nation building in the post-UN support environment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectdevelopmenten
dc.subjectpeace operation missionsen
dc.subjecttransporten
dc.subjectorganisational structureen
dc.subjectEast Timoren
dc.titleTransport in East Timor : post conflict rehabilitationen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Professional Studiesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMANen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMAN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeCanterburyen


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