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dc.contributor.authorJohns, Wynefield A.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T23:34:29Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5365
dc.description.abstractRoad authorities in developed nations are required by their government agencies to prepare management strategies taking into account of the United Nations 'Convention on Biological Diversity' and biodiversity conservation. This international pressure has come from the United Nation requiring nations to adopt biological diversity and sustainable systems; a previously overlooked land resource has been exposed by this initiative, namely the land on either side of motor vehicle highways. In New Zealand this amounts to 92,000 kilometres of highway and approximately 140,000 hectares of land, all of which are in public ownership, and distributed throughout the three islands of North, South and Stewart Islands. With such publicly available land there are three good reasons to adopt roadside verges to foster New Zealand native plants: High public visibility; Widespread geographic spread allows a majority of New Zealand species to benefit; Potential opportunities for public ecological enhancement schemes and volunteer projects.en
dc.format.extent1-44en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln University
dc.subjectfosteringen
dc.subjectbiological diversityen
dc.subjectbiodiversityen
dc.subjectroadside vergeen
dc.titleFostering native plants on roadside vergesen
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Professional Studiesen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Design
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMAN
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050202 Conservation and Biodiversityen
dc.subject.anzsrc050104 Landscape Ecologyen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/ENVIRONMAN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
dc.publisher.placeChristchurch, New Zealanden


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