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dc.contributor.authorAhumada, Pablo E.en
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-18T03:38:01Z
dc.date.created2016-12-06en
dc.identifier.citationAhumada, P. E. (2007).The theoretical relevance of an updated Marxian theory of commodity in economics. Presentation of results to the Commerce Faculty, Lincoln University. 3 April 2007.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5373
dc.description.abstractHow does material production become socially recognised in Capitalist production? Capitalism breaks down the immediate unity of the material and social moments of production, characteristic of previous modes, into two interlocked yet autonomous spheres: material production and market exchange. Commodity, its basic unit, renders production global and atomistic for the first time in history, with material production taking place in social isolation; that is, privately and independently.This paper analyses why the above fundamental question is unanswerable in Classical Political Economy and Neo-Classical Economics; the former being unilaterally focussed on material production and the latter on the market. It also assesses Marx’s attempted account of the differentiated unity characterising commodity production. That is, private work becomes objective social labour as the substance of the value of commodities, and social labour finds its necessary expression in the money-form of commodities. The paper concludes by highlighting the gaps in Marx’s economic argument.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/5173en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectcapitalist productionen
dc.subjectcommodityen
dc.subjecteconomicsen
dc.subjectsocial labouren
dc.subjectmarket exchangeen
dc.subjectMarxen
dc.titleThe theoretical relevance of an updated Marxian theory of commodity in economicsen
dc.typeOral Presentation
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFINen
dc.subject.anzsrc1401 Economic Theoryen
pubs.notesOral Presentation to the Commerce Faculty, Lincoln University. 3 April 2007.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFIN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/5173en
pubs.start-date2007-04-03en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln University, Canterburyen
dc.audienceCommerce Facultyen


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