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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Paula J. M.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-19T01:52:28Z
dc.date.available2013-04-19T01:52:28Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5389
dc.description.abstractAlmost all landscapes can be considered cultural landscapes. Set within the context of the wider cultural landscape, occur locations where evidence of the past is more apparent than elsewhere, labelled historic landscapes. Some historic landscapes are special places which have escaped change. This group, relict landscapes, includes the abandoned gold mining villages of Central Otago. Settlers arriving at a new location bring with them not only a comprehensive 'Portmanteau Biota', but also a weight of cultural baggage - ideas about how they should live in their new environment. Planting is one of the ways in which settlers change their surroundings to make themselves at home. The past and the present intertwine when we experience relict landscapes. Managers of relict landscapes should be aware of the important contribution that cultural plantings make, along with and inseparable from, other continuous threads from the past such as buildings, earthworks and artifacts. Cultural plantings often contribute strongly to the sense of place to which we respond when we experience relict landscapes, and should be valued and managed accordingly. Good management decisions can only be made with a thorough understanding of the dynamics of relict cultural vegetation, and with clear objectives in mind. This dissertation considers the impact miners have had in Central Otago, and in particular features Macetown as a case study.en
dc.format88 leaves
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectcultural landscapeen
dc.subjecthistoryen
dc.subjectland useen
dc.subjecthistorical perspectivesen
dc.subjectgold mining heritageen
dc.subjectCentral Otagoen
dc.subjectearly settlersen
dc.titleAbandoned villages : cultural planting in the relict landscapes of Central Otago : meanings and management : [dissertation, Diploma in Landscape Architecture, Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital dissertation can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only.
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen


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