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dc.contributor.authorElton, David
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-21T23:16:25Z
dc.date.available2013-04-21T23:16:25Z
dc.date.issued1976
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5391
dc.descriptionAccompanying plans 1-10 have been scanned separately.en
dc.description.abstractThe self-contained catchment is unique in several ways. The largely volcanic origin of the geological layers have left a striking landform of steeply rising domes that encircle and dominate the deeply indented valleys. The unusual micro-climate and the loess volcanic derived soils, with other factors, produced a very dense and diversified forest vegetation, containing 560 active species of 78 families. In the last 100 years the cultural layer has profoundly affected the visual appearance of the catchment and in the main the development has not been sympathetic with the natural systems. Land-use practices have disregarded not only the visual and ecological variety of the land form and flora, but in suppressing the natural climax species have created situations of instability. This instability is manifest in the visual, ecological and pedalogical systems. In recent years increasing pressure has been put on the catchment to absorb some overspill development from Dunedin, despite the fact that the natural systems of the area are very sensitive and no detailed investigation has been undertaken to check their capabilities and limits. Similarly, the wide opportunities for recreation that the catchment possesses and the increased demand for rural-passive recreation by urban dwellers have not been researched thoroughly, nor the fact that large-scale development could create conflicts for recreation; demands, if not the destruction of the recreation resource.en
dc.format60 pages
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectnatural resourcesen
dc.subjectrecreationen
dc.subjectcultural systemsen
dc.subjectWaitatien
dc.subjectBlueskin Bayen
dc.subjectland formen
dc.subjectforest vegetationen
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.titleWaitati by Blueskin Bay : [dissertation, Diploma in Landscape Architecture, Lincoln College]en
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorCole, Mike
lu.thesis.supervisorDaley, Gavin
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University.en
dc.subject.anzsrc050204 Environmental Impact Assessmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc1203 Design Practice and Managementen


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