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dc.contributor.authorBentley, C. R.
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T01:52:05Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T01:52:05Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5400
dc.descriptionNB: Accompanying plan #1/10 is not yet digitally available. See library copy.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation looks at the impact of residential development in a coastal landscape. It attempts to show how landscape planning can guide development so that it has minimal impact on the landscape. To acheive this goal, this dissertation studies Rapaki, a small coastal area within Lyttelton Harbour. Initially it looks at residential development around the harbour, particularly along the northern side, and the environmental problems that have occurred there. This illustrates the regional scene, in which Rapaki is set, and is essential in that it identifies the major environmental problems to be avoided when placing residential development in the Lyttelton Harbour landscape. The dissertation then focuses on a more detailed study of Rapaki, to determine the amount of housing that could be accepted there and show how this development can be integrated into the landscape with the least impact. Rapaki is a Maori reserve lying west of Cass Bay, on the northern side of Lyttelton Harbour. It remains relatively undeveloped compared with Corsair and Cass Bays. The Rapaki reserve is owned by members of the Ngaitahu tribe. Several members have expressed their desire to return to and build on their land. Part of the reserve is zoned 'Residential' which, according to the Ministry of Works and Development 'Coastal Recreation Planning Study of Banks Peninsula', will result in a growth in the number of both permanent and holiday homes. "A large area has been zoned residential in the Mount Herbert County District Scheme which will mean a growth of both permanent and holiday homes …. if existing vegetation is retained the impact of more houses would be lessened visually. Such growth, however, will destroy the unique, quiet, semi-rural character of the existing community". (2) Rapaki will undoubtedly become more developed in the future. This study will assist people involved in development at Rapaki, by identifying problems to be avoided and presenting design guidelines that will enable housing to be integrated with the landscape in a sympathetic manner. The second part of this study will be a comprehensive design for Rapaki, involving landuse management and landscape proposals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectresidential developmenten
dc.subjectimpacten
dc.subjectlandscape planningen
dc.subjectRapakien
dc.subjectmanagementen
dc.titleRapaki : a study of coastal residential developmenten
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorRackham, Allan
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.rights.accessRightsThis digital dissertation can be viewed only by current staff and students of Lincoln University. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc120101 Architectural Designen
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen


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