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dc.contributor.authorTavares, Silvia Garcia
dc.contributor.authorSwaffield, Simon R.
dc.contributor.authorStewart, Emma
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T23:42:20Z
dc.date.available2013-05-08T23:42:20Z
dc.date.issued2013-05
dc.identifier.isbn978‐0‐86476‐321‐1
dc.identifier.issn2230‐4207
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5422
dc.description.abstractA series of earthquakes has forced Christchurch to re-plan and rebuild. Discussions about rebuilding strategies have emphasized the intention of making it a city for the future, sustainable and vibrant. This paper discusses the relationship between microclimate and urban culture in Christchurch based upon the concept of urban comfort. It explores the relationships between environment, people and culture to help understand the local requirements for urban landscape design. In this paper we claim that cultural requirements also should be taken into account when looking for sustainable strategies. A distinctive feature of this research is its focus on the way people are adapting to both surviving prequake and new post‐quake environments. Preliminary findings from the first year of field work using participant observation and 61 in‐depth interviews with Christchurch residents are presented. The interviews were carried out in a variety of urban settings including: established sites (places sustaining relatively little damage) and emerging sites (those requiring rebuilding) during 2011‐2012. Evidence from the interviews highlight future challenges regarding sustainability and urban comfort issues. Post‐quake Christchurch presents a remarkable opportunity to design an urban landscape which provides environmental, economic, social and cultural sustainability. However, to achieve successful outcomes it is fundamental to respond to the local culture. Field data suggest that the strong connections between urban and rural settings present in local culture, lifestyle and landscape generate a particular aesthetic and recreation preference for urban spaces, which should be considered in the urban landscape design strategies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Department of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from http://www.lincoln.ac.nz/leapen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesLand Environment and People Research Paper ; no. 19en
dc.relation.urihttp://www.lincoln.ac.nz/Research/Research-Centres/Centre-for-Land-Environment-and-People/LEaP-Publications/
dc.rights©LEaP, Lincoln University, New Zealand 2012. This information may be copied or reproduced electronically and distributed to others without restriction, provided LEaP, Lincoln University is acknowledged as the source of information. Under no circumstances may a charge be made for this information without the express permission of LEaP, Lincoln University, New Zealanden
dc.subjecturban comforten
dc.subjectmicroclimateen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectlandscape designen
dc.subjectChristchurchen
dc.subjectearthquakesen
dc.titleSustainability, microclimate and culture in post-earthquake Christchurchen
dc.typeMonographen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc120508 Urban Designen


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