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dc.contributor.authorPowell, John
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-03T03:17:33Z
dc.date.available2013-07-03T03:17:33Z
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5515
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation addresses the question of meanings in gardens from a humanist point of view. It is particularly concerned with examining the commonly held notion that a garden is a work of art. It is limited in scope to western garden styles, and it is limited in scope also in that it discusses gardens only, and ignores all other areas of landscape design. This latter limit has been imposed not only because of considerations of space, but also because It Is considered that, of all the areas of landscape design, gardens are the area richest in meanings and the area in which the creation of a work of art is most likely and possible. This dissertation does not aim to set down "shoulds" and "oughts" with regard to garden design. It is merely an attempt to examine and clarify, for the benefit of its author and anyone else who may be interested, some fuzzy but commonly held assumptions. Chapter One opens with a range of descriptions and definitions of gardens. It examines gardens as reflections of man's attitude to nature and to the world in general, and reviews the reasons which have led man to create gardens. Chapter Two discusses garden materials and overall garden form as elements of symbolic meaning. The traditional Sufi garden and the contemporary Californian garden are examined as gardens rich in such symbolic meanings. Chapter Three is central to the dissertation. It is concerned with the garden as a special sort of symbol - an art symbol. Suzanne Langer's art theories are presented and an attempt is made to relate these to the area of garden design. Chapter Four presents Geoffrey Jellicoe, Roberto Burle Marx, Ted Smyth and their work. These three men all consider their work as art and it is here examined from this point of view. Chapter Five considers some contemporary landscape architectural writing on aesthetics. It offers thoughts on the Implications for the teaching and practice of landscape architecture if garden design is indeed an art.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.subjectdesignen
dc.subjectgardensen
dc.subjectarten
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectspaceen
dc.titleThawed music? : a humanistic study of meaning in Western gardensen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorDensem, Graham
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc120107 Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc120301 Design History and Theoryen


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