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dc.contributor.authorJefferies, Bruce E.
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-18T22:56:20Z
dc.date.available2013-08-18T22:56:20Z
dc.date.issued1987
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5592
dc.description.abstractThe “raw materials” of subtropical Terai jungles to the highest point on the earth's surface typifies the unique bio-geographical location of Nepal. Mix this topography with the natural and cultural blends contained within this rectangular shaped country, of about 800 Kms in length by 140 Kms in width, with a population of approximately 17 million people, and it is not surprising that tourism is a well established part of Nepal’s economy. There is only one Sagarmatha, “Mother of the Universe” just as there is only one “Old Faithful” in Yellowstone National Park in the USA, Fujiyama in Japan, or Tongariro in New Zealand. These and many other special natural features (and relatively recently cultural sites) have been identified by governments for special protection, and by the tourism industry as promotion as places worth visiting by tourists. In most instances the only common denominator for many of these special places is the fact that they have been given formal protection as national parks, wildlife reserves, sanctuaries (or similar designations) by governments all around the world. To some people the relationship between tourism and protected area management may seem obscure. This is not the case as tourism is an important justification for maintaining a national park in the Sagarmatha area. It is, however, only one justification, and the objectives of the S.N.P. Management Plan balance tourist use against six other primary management objectives. In terms of the economic benefits to Nepal as a country and the considerable economic advantages for the local Sherpa people of the park, it is surely a very important one. Our previous ability to disregard tourism as an almost incidental use of protected areas is a negative legacy of the past that we cannot afford to perpetrate. Tourism is already recognised as the world's second largest industry and the fastest growing. It has made and will continue to make a considerable impact on the social, economic and environmental fabric of Nepal. In 1986 nearly 34,000 visitors stated that the objective of their visit in Nepal was for mountaineering and trekking. (Rising Nepal, March 1987). Many of these visitors focus directly on the national parks and protected areas of the country. Sagarmatha with its special blend of natural and cultural features acts almost as a magnet to many of these visitors. Section I is reasonably specific and is primarily directed towards tourism. Section II recognises that tourism cannot be treated in isolation from almost all other management responsibilities and consequently broadens into an assessment of management awareness, capacity and effectiveness. This need to broaden the subject matter also necessitated the development of some long term approaches which are more holistic than those which would normally be suggested for specific impacts and problems. The justification for this is that resource management reponsibility, particularly in protected areas, cannot in most instances be compartmentalised. The cause and effect relationship of tourism cannot be dealt with in isolation and for this reason capacity and effectiveness across the broad spectrum of management reponsibility has been measured.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectSagarmatha National Parken
dc.subjectNepalen
dc.subjectconservationen
dc.subjecttourismen
dc.subjectpark managementen
dc.subjectparks and protected areasen
dc.titleSagarmatha National Park and toursim : a study of the background, impacts and relationships of tourism development and park management responses in a World Heritage Siteen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Parks and Recreationen
lu.thesis.supervisorDevlin, Pat
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sporten
dc.subject.anzsrc050209 Natural Resource Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc150601 Impacts of Tourismen


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