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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Christopher Jon
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-18T23:56:05Z
dc.date.available2013-08-18T23:56:05Z
dc.date.issued1982
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5595
dc.description.abstractMan is a territorial animal. To exist he must have frontiers to cross, and as each crossed, there must be another on the horizon. Today, that frontier is the sea; beautiful and dangerous, elegant and strong, bountiful and capricious. Science and technology have opened the gates; have made this liquid world safer to explore, and the bounty it will return is limited only by man's vision, knowledge and boldness. Beyond mere material return however - perhaps even more important than fuels, minerals and food - man needs the sea as an outlet for his restless spirit. As in any exploration, the physical excursion will provide a catalyst for science and economic wealth. No growth, however, is meaningful without the application of a creative intellect. Science of the sea is not enough. To prevent the sea from becoming a jungled wasteland, man must apply reason and caution and purpose. Fortunately for man, the very nature of the liquid world stimulates creativity and inspires respect. Many a would-be plunderer, once he floats weightlessly and effortlessly amidst its great beauty, returns from the sea a zealous missionary. Today, any human can become a man in the sea. He can explore tropical reefs, dive for ancient treasure, commune with his fellow mammals. But to progress far, he must also listen with a creative mind and thoughtful spirit. The sea is willing to share her secrets, if man is willing to listen. And if he listens well, he may learn far more about himself.en
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterbury
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectinterpretationen
dc.subjectdivingen
dc.subjectmarine environmenten
dc.titleUnderwater interpretation : a look at the needs benefits and possible application of underwater interpretation in the New Zealand park system, with particular reference to three New Zealand situationsen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelDiplomaen
thesis.degree.nameDiploma of Parks and Recreationen
lu.thesis.supervisorDobbins, Alex
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Social Science, Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Sport
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. If you are the author of this item, please contact us if you wish to discuss making the full text publicly available.en
dc.subject.anzsrc150605 Tourism Resource Appraisalen
dc.subject.anzsrc050203 Environmental Education and Extensionen


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