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dc.contributor.authorScott, Kate J.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-15T03:16:03Z
dc.date.available2014-04-15T03:16:03Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5964
dc.descriptionThe New Zealand Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme develops emerging agribusiness leaders to help shape the future of New Zealand agribusiness and rural affairs. Lincoln University has been involved with this leaders programme since 1979 when it was launched with a grant from the Kellogg Foundation, USA.en
dc.description.abstractFood production globally has undergone massive change over the last few decades but recently consumers have rediscovered a desire to connect with producers and to be reassured that the food they eat is healthy and comes from a source that conforms to their political, ethical and moral beliefs. The rise of the 'conscious consumer/ the resurgence of Farmers' Markets, environmental and health concerns about modern farming and the fight-back by small producers against the globalisation of food have all contributed to putting concerns about food production methods in the foreground of many global campaigns. Farming for the production of natural fibres faces many of the same challenges that food producers are confronted by, with the added impediment that wholly synthetic fibre is not just possible but is in fact dominant in the global market. Even highly processed foods have to start from an agricultural source, but textiles can be created entirely artificially, often from petrochemicals. Natural fibre producers need to pull together to give voice to the consumer benefits of their products, and the environmental and social benefits of natural fibres, and the message needs to be delivered loudest to the same people who are already strongly interested in food production from an ethical viewpoint.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Faculty of Commerce. Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesKellogg Rural Leaders Programme reporten
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author.en
dc.subjectslow fooden
dc.subjectfarmer's marketsen
dc.subjectnatural fibresen
dc.subjectcommunity supported agricultureen
dc.subjectcelebrity chefsen
dc.subjecttextilesen
dc.subjectconsumer benefitsen
dc.subjectfood politicsen
dc.titleBuono, pulito e giusto: can getting dressed be an agricultural act?en
dc.typeMonographen
lu.contributor.unitKellogg Rural Leadersen
dc.subject.anzsrc220303 Environmental Philosophyen
dc.subject.anzsrc1505 Marketingen
dc.subject.anzsrc1402 Applied Economicsen


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