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dc.contributor.authorPope, A. R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-12T02:36:42Z
dc.date.available2014-05-12T02:36:42Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/5977
dc.description.abstractThe traditional enclosed office is becoming less common. The term “workspace” is more reflective of modern workplaces characterised by open plan design, together with some private offices and / or meeting rooms. A number of definitions and expressions are used to describe workspace and the literature generally expresses positive outcomes as a result of changes to workspace. In order to determine how modern workspace initiatives have been adopted, interviews were conducted with eight organisations varying from the private sector to the non-profit public sector. The responding staff members used practical terminology, with the redesigned workspace being referred to as “open plan.” Respondents perceived the changes to the workspace as positive, with teamwork and communication benefits being acknowledged. Such teamwork and communication benefits suggest an open workspace environment is important, but it also needs to be carefully balanced with a workspace that allows for individual concentration and more focused teamwork. The idea that the workspace is primarily important for adding value rather than cost saving benefits, is gaining ascendancy amongst many organisations, and this confirms the opinions of several workspace thought leaders. Adding value factors such as inspiring interior design, enhanced lighting and air conditioning can make workspaces feel more residential in nature and provide an employee friendly environment. Furthermore the recognition of the culture of the work environment is important to understand and sometimes workspace redesign can help improve the culture. Only a minority of staff did not respond to the workspace changes well. It is difficult to predict who these minorities will be, although it can sometimes be older staff members and people who could lose their perceived status such as senior management. In making changes to the workspace a consultative approach is highly recommended for the firms unity, but equally this approach must be decisive. It is rare for workspace redesign exercises to be undertaken because of recognition of the resulting benefits alone. Usually there needs to be a catalyst such as a significant strategic change or a merger with another company to initiate redesign. Concepts such as hoteling and hot desking are not commonly used. They present difficult management problems and are resisted by staff who remain territorial by nature.en
dc.formatxii, 107 pages, 22 leaves
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectworkspaceen
dc.subjecthot deskingen
dc.subjectopen planen
dc.subjectorganisational ecologyen
dc.subjectdesk sharingen
dc.subjectjust-in-time officesen
dc.subjectintegrated workplace strategyen
dc.subjectoffice spaceen
dc.titleDetermining how organisations have adopted modern workspace initiatives : a dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Property Studies at Lincoln Universityen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Property Studiesen
lu.thesis.supervisorMcDonagh, John
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Management and Property Studiesen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital dissertation can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only.
dc.subject.anzsrc1503 Business and Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc150310 Organisation and Management Theoryen


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