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dc.contributor.authorMacKenzie, Jason R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-31T02:11:04Z
dc.date.available2014-07-31T02:11:04Z
dc.date.issued1995
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6288
dc.description.abstractCathepsin B is a cysteine protease which has been implicated in the development and progression of various cancers. It is often redistributed to the plasma membrane, and inactive forms of the enzyme are commonly found in tumour tissue exudates. The secretion of cathepsin B from cancer cells is thought to correlate with their invasive potential. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterise polymorphism in the human cathepsin B gene. PCR was used in the amplification of exon 7 and intron 7 of the human cathepsin B gene, using primers designed from the reported bovine and human cathepsin B genes. The two resulting amplimers were of different size, revealing a potential polymorphism. 10 human volunteers were screened for this variation, and sequencing of the variant amplimers identified two previously unreported alleles of the human cathepsin B gene. One allele is thought to confer increased stability to the primary transcript for cathepsin B, and hence may alter gene expression in homozygous carriers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectcathepsin Ben
dc.subjectpolymorphismen
dc.subjectgene expressionen
dc.subjectcancer cellsen
dc.subjectallelesen
dc.subjecttumouren
dc.titlePolymorphism in the human Cathepsin B geneen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelOtheren
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorMason, Sue
lu.thesis.supervisorHickford, Jon
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc11 Medical and Health Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc111203 Cancer Geneticsen


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