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dc.contributor.authorSwanson, Stacey Sonja
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-31T21:16:09Z
dc.date.available2014-08-31T21:16:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6336
dc.description.abstractDiffuse, or non-point source pollution, derives from a vast array of activities which involve no single distinct source thus making it difficult to manage with regulations. Efforts to do so have been gaining considerable momentum both internationally and in New Zealand. This research examines how approaches to regulate diffuse pollution differ between New Zealand and the United States, and what challenges these differences present for water quality policy implementation. It uses a comparative case study approach and focuses on the catchments of Te Waihora and Chesapeake Bay. Drawing on a conceptual framework that focuses on factors which influence policy implementation, this study highlights that although setting quantitative limits may appear ideal in theory, the complexity of diffuse pollution and the capacity of governments to regulate it make the implementation of resource limits very challenging.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectdiffuse pollutionen
dc.subjectnon-point source pollutionen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectUnited Statesen
dc.subjectCanterburyen
dc.subjectTe Waihoraen
dc.subjectChesapeake Bayen
dc.subjectDelawareen
dc.subjectagricultureen
dc.subjectnutrient load limiten
dc.titleSetting limits to regulate non-point source pollution: a comparative study of New Zealand and the United Statesen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorDuncan, Ronlyn
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc050206 Environmental Monitoringen
dc.subject.anzsrc050204 Environmental Impact Assessmenten


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