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dc.contributor.authorBrakenrig, Marc
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-27T22:31:56Z
dc.date.available2015-01-27T22:31:56Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6421
dc.description.abstractAutomatic Milking Systems (AMS) represent a revolutionary innovation in dairy farming, which not only replaces the physical labour required to harvest milk, but also influences the entire farm system. This dissertation investigates the key drivers, planning and outcomes of AMS adoption for six established New Zealand AMS farms. All of the case study farmers were identified to be in the innovator class of adopters and operate three different farm systems (confined, hybrid or pasture-based) with differing use of structures, level of supplementary feeding and calving. Effective farm area and herd size of all of the case study farms were well below their respective district averages for traditional dairy systems. Production per cow and per hectare were however much higher than the district averages with some of the case studies producing twice as much as the traditional systems. Key drivers of AMS adoption were linked to the individual circumstances of the participants and the physical resources of their farms. These also influenced the robotic system adopted. Potential production increases were key interests of confined and hybrid system farmers, while the challenge of making the systems work was a key driver across all of the farm systems. A number of different sources of information were used during the planning stage with the most valuable of these sources being physical visits to existing AMS operations. Key factors for successful AMS development included farm layout, cow to robot ratio, cow selection and system simplicity. Key outcomes of AMS adoption included beneficial improvements in animal health/condition, high animal production and a change in lifestyle. Limitations of the system included large establishment costs, increased operating expenses and the stress of transitioning to the robotic system. Limitations of specific systems included added stress to the seasonal workload of pasture-based systems and a lack of professional advice, particularly for confined systems. Participants were positive in regard to the future for AMS in NZ dairy farming, especially for smaller farms, with opportunities to further improve current systems and integrate other farming disciplines.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectinnovation adoptionen
dc.subjectautomatic milking systemsen
dc.subjectAMSen
dc.subjectrobotic farmingen
dc.subjectNew Zealand dairy farmingen
dc.subjectagricultural technologiesen
dc.titleAdoption of automatic milking technologies: case studies of New Zealand automatic milking systemsen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Agricultural Science (Honours)en
lu.thesis.supervisorPangborn, Marvin
lu.thesis.supervisorWoodford, Keith
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Management and Property Studiesen
dc.subject.anzsrc070106 Farm Management, Rural Management and Agribusinessen
dc.subject.anzsrc070107 Farming Systems Researchen
dc.subject.anzsrc099901 Agricultural Engineeringen
dc.subject.anzsrc109999 Technology not elsewhere classifieden
dc.subject.anzsrc0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Managementen


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