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dc.contributor.authorBarraquand, F.en
dc.contributor.authorEzard, T. H.en
dc.contributor.authorJørgensen, P. S.en
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, N.en
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, S.en
dc.contributor.authorSalguero-Ǵomez, R.en
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Timothy J.en
dc.contributor.authorPoisot, T.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-02T23:34:25Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04en
dc.date.issued2014-03-04en
dc.date.submitted2014-01-31en
dc.identifier.citationBarraquand et al. (2014), Lack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: a survey of the problem and potential solutions. PeerJ 2:e285; DOI 10.7717/peerj.285en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6484
dc.description.abstractProficiency in mathematics and statistics is essential to modern ecological science, yet few studies have assessed the level of quantitative training received by ecologists. To do so, we conducted an online survey. The 937 respondents were mostly early-career scientists who studied biology as undergraduates. We found a clear self-perceived lack of quantitative training: 75% were not satisfied with their understanding of mathematical models; 75% felt that the level of mathematics was "too low" in their ecology classes; 90% wanted more mathematics classes for ecologists; and 95% more statistics classes. Respondents thought that 30% of classes in ecology-related degrees should be focused on quantitative disciplines, which is likely higher than for most existing programs. The main suggestion to improve quantitative training was to relate theoretical and statistical modeling to applied ecological problems. Improving quantitative training will require dedicated, quantitative classes for ecology-related degrees that contain good mathematical and statistical practice.© 2014 Barraquand et al.en
dc.format.extent14en
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeerJ Inc.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - PeerJ Inc. - https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.285 - https://peerj.com/articles/285/en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.285en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors. Distributed under Creative Commons CC-BY 3.0en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectEcology studenten
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectMathematicsen
dc.subjectStatisticsen
dc.subjectStudenten
dc.subjectTeachingen
dc.subjectUniversity curriculumen
dc.titleLack of quantitative training among early-career ecologists: A survey of the problem and potential solutionsen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
lu.contributor.uniten
lu.contributor.uniten
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.285en
dc.relation.isPartOfPeerJen
pubs.issue1en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/2018 PBRF Staff group
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://peerj.com/articles/285/en
pubs.volume2013en
dc.identifier.eissn2167-8359en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-8817-4360


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