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dc.contributor.authorHoskins, Anikaaro Isabella Ross
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-31T21:47:47Z
dc.date.available2015-03-31T21:47:47Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6506
dc.description.abstractThis thesis is a theoretical exploration of ‘remembrance’ and its production in the interactions between people/s and the landscape. This exploration takes place in the broad context of post earthquake Christchurch with a focus on public spaces along the Ōtākaro – Avon river corridor. Memory is universal to human beings, yet memories are subjective and culturally organized and produced - the relationship between memory and place therefore operates at individual and collective levels. Design responses that facilitate opportunities to create new memories, and also acknowledge the remembered past of human – landscape relationships are critical for social cohesion and wellbeing. I draw on insights from a range of theoretical sources, including critical interpretive methodologies, to validate subjective individual and group responses to memory and place. Such approaches also allowed me, as the researcher, considerable freedom to apply memory theory through film to illustrate ways we can re-member ourselves to our landscapes. The Ōtākaro-Avon river provided the site through and in which film strategies for remembrance are explored. Foregrounding differences in Māori and settler cultural orientations to memory and landscape, has highlighted the need for landscape design to consider remembrance - those cognitive and unseen dimensions that intertwine people and place. I argue it is our task to make space for such diverse relationships, and to ensure these stories and memories, embodied in landscape can be read through generations. I do not prescribe methods or strategies; rather I have sought to encourage thinking and debate and to suggest approaches through which the possibilities for remembrance may be enhanced.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjectmemoryen
dc.subjectlandscapeen
dc.subjectinterpretationen
dc.subjectlandscape architectureen
dc.subjectmnemonicsen
dc.subjectremembranceen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectfilmen
dc.titleInterpreting the terrain for remembranceen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Landscape Architectureen
lu.thesis.supervisorBowring, Jacqueline
lu.thesis.supervisorAbbott, Mick
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc12 Built Environment and Designen
dc.subject.anzsrc1201 Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc1203 Design Practice and Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc1299 Other Built Environment and Designen
dc.subject.anzsrc1799 Other Psychology and Cognitive Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc1604 Human Geographyen
dc.subject.anzsrc2002 Cultural Studiesen


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