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dc.contributor.authorFountain, Joanna M.en
dc.contributor.authorEspiner, Stephen R.en
dc.contributor.authorXie, X.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-10T02:26:10Z
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationFountain, J., Espiner, S., & Xie, X. (2010). A cultural framing of nature: Chinese tourists' motivations for, expectations of, and satisfaction with their New Zealand tourist experience. In Orams, M., Lück, M., Poulston, J., & Race, S. (Eds.). Proceedings of the New Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Research Conference, 24-26 November 2010. (pp. 69-86). Auckland, New Zealand: AUT University.en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6612
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, the Chinese holiday market has become very important to the New Zealand tourism industry, and now represents its fourth largest source of visitors. Understanding Chinese tourist motivations for, expectations of, and satisfaction with their tourism experience is, therefore, crucial for the future development of the market. Existing research suggests that for Chinese visitors, like other market segments, the natural landscape has a big influence over the decision to travel to New Zealand. There is an emerging concern, however, that the country‘s tourism product must diversify if it is to continue to attract an increasingly sophisticated and discerning market, and attention is now shifting to utilize the appeal of culture and heritage attractions in New Zealand, particularly those centred on Māori cultural products. This paper reports on research into Chinese tourists‘ motivations, expectations and behaviour with respect to their travel in New Zealand. Particular emphasis is given to an exploration of the relative importance of nature and culture to Chinese tourists in New Zealand. Data were collected via a self-completed questionnaire administered to 181 Chinese tourists visiting Queenstown. The findings suggest that the Chinese market may be particularly suited to a culturally-oriented experience of New Zealand, but one based less on Māori culture as it is often portrayed to tourists (e.g. cultural performances, experiencing a hangi), and more on the opportunities to learn about Māori stories and legends as part of visiting natural environments. The implications of these findings for shaping the Chinese tourist gaze in New Zealand are discussed.en
dc.format.extent69-86en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAUT Universityen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - AUT University - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/4076en
dc.rightsCopyright © The Authors.en
dc.sourceNew Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Research Conference 2010en
dc.subjectChinese touristsen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectmotivationsen
dc.subjectexpectationsen
dc.subjectnatureen
dc.subjectcultural tourismen
dc.titleA cultural framing of nature: Chinese tourists' motivations for, expectations of, and satisfaction with their New Zealand tourist experienceen
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
dc.subject.anzsrc1506 Tourismen
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of the New Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Research Conference 2010: Adding value through researchen
pubs.finish-date2010-11-26en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/PE20
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/4076en
pubs.start-date2010-11-24en
dc.publisher.placeAucklanden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3320-2632
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-2556-3216
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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