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dc.contributor.authorTavares, Silvia Garcia
dc.date.accessioned2015-08-27T22:09:13Z
dc.date.available2015-08-27T22:09:13Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6666
dc.description.abstractThe urban environment influences the way people live and shape their everyday lives, and microclimate sensitive design can enhance the use of urban streets and public spaces. Innovative approaches to urban microclimate design will become more important as the world’s population becomes ever more urban, and climate change generates more variability and extremes in urban microclimatic conditions. However, established methods of investigation based upon conventions drawn from building services research and framed by physiological concepts of thermal comfort may fail to capture the social dynamics of urban activity and their interrelationship with microclimate. This research investigates the relationship between microclimate and urban culture in Christchurch, New Zealand, based upon the concept of urban comfort. Urban comfort is defined as the socio-cultural (therefore collective) adaptation to microclimate due to satisfaction with the urban environment. It involves consideration of a combination of human thermal comfort requirements and adaptive comfort circumstances, preferences and strategies. A main methodological challenge was to investigate urban comfort in a city undergoing rapid physical change following a series of major earthquakes (2010-2011), and that also has a strongly seasonal climate which accentuates microclimatic variability. The field investigation had to be suitable for rapidly changing settings as buildings were demolished and rebuilt, and be able to capture data relevant to a cycle of seasons. These local circumstances meant that Christchurch was valuable as an example of a city facing rapid and unpredictable change. An interpretive, integrative, and adaptive research strategy that combined qualitative social science methods with biophysical measures was adopted. The results are based upon participant observation, 86 in-depth interviews with Christchurch residents, and microclimate data measurements. The interviews were carried out in a variety of urban settings including established urban settings (places sustaining relatively little damage) and emerging urban settings (those requiring rebuilding) during 2011-2013. Results of this research show that urban comfort depends on adaptive strategies which in turn depend on culture. Adaptive strategies identified through the data analysis show a strong connection between natural and built landscapes, combined with the regional outdoor culture, the Garden City identity and the connections between rural and urban landscapes. The results also highlight that thermal comfort is an important but insufficient indicator of good microclimate design, as social and cultural values are important influences on climate experience and adaptation. Interpretive research is needed to fully understand urban comfort and to provide urban microclimate design solutions to enhance the use of public open spaces in cities undergoing change.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectmicroclimateen
dc.subjectadaptationen
dc.subjectadaptive capacityen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjecturban designen
dc.subjectChristchurchen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectcomforten
dc.subjecturban landscapeen
dc.subjecturbanisationen
dc.subjectCanterbury earthquakesen
dc.titleUrban comfort: adaptive capacity in post-earthquake Christchurchen
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorLincoln Universityen
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen
lu.thesis.supervisorSwaffield, Simon
lu.thesis.supervisorStewart, Emma J
lu.contributor.unitSchool of Landscape Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc1201 Architectureen
dc.subject.anzsrc1205 Urban and Regional Planningen
dc.subject.anzsrc120508 Urban Designen
dc.subject.anzsrc120501 Community Planningen
dc.rights.licenceAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*


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