Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStevenson, Georgia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-17T03:08:48Z
dc.date.available2015-12-17T03:08:48Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6774
dc.description.abstractFrost can affect the productivity and distribution of plants, as it can cause plant cell rupture and xylem cavitation, which may limit the water transport, growth, and survival of plants. Climate change is expected to increase the effect of frost on plants, making them more susceptible to frost events. Therefore it is necessary to determine the frost susceptibility of species, which may be done using a plant functional trait approach. Plant functional traits are any attribute of a plant which can influence its establishment, survival and fitness. Frost tolerant species are expected to possess traits that reflect a conservative life history strategy aimed at stress tolerance, such as small and thick leaves, low specific leaf area, high leaf dry matter content, high leaf vein density and vein length per unit area, and high wood density. We sampled twenty-three plant species in Australia and twenty-five plant species in New Zealand, and compared their functional traits to existing species-specific frost susceptibility datasets. The traits most likely to influence frost susceptibility appear to be leaf size traits, leaf venation traits, and wood density, which is most likely due to the important effects these traits have on plant hydraulics, which is known to be significantly impacted by frost. Higher leaf vein density and vein length per unit area provide greater leaf hydraulics and better water use efficiency, which helps plants survive the water stress conditions that can be caused by frost. Higher wood density is related to having narrow xylem vessels, which are more resistant to freeze-thaw induced xylem cavitation and embolism, compared to wider xylem vessels. This study has provided globally-new information about which plant functional traits may be associated with frost susceptibility in plant species, and demonstrates for the first time the promise of leaf venation traits as a means of predicting and understanding response of plants to frost.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln Universityen
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectfrosten
dc.subjectclimate changeen
dc.subjectleaf areaen
dc.subjectspecific leaf areaen
dc.subjectleaf dry matter contenten
dc.subjectleaf thicknessen
dc.subjectvein densityen
dc.subjectxylem flowen
dc.subjectfunctional traitsen
dc.titlePlant functional traits associated with frost susceptibilityen
dc.typeDissertationen
thesis.degree.nameBachelor of Science (Honours)en
lu.thesis.supervisorCurran, Timothy
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc060705 Plant Physiologyen


Files in this item

Default Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record