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dc.contributor.authorTozer, Katherine N.en
dc.contributor.authorAtes, Serkanen
dc.contributor.authorMapp, Natalieen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Malcolm . C.en
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Richard J.en
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Granten
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-26T00:08:16Z
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.issn0110-8581en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/6890
dc.description.abstractPasture growth, botanical composition and sheep grazing preference were measured over 20 months in tall fescue (cultivar Advance), without endophyte (Nil) or infected with AR542 (MaxPTM) endophyte, and clover pastures sown into a dryland soil, Canterbury, New Zealand. Pastures were rotationally grazed with sheep, with grazing preference for the two endophyte treatments measured in late autumn and early spring. Annual dry matter production from April 2004 to April 2005 was not significantly different between AR542 (6293 kg DM/ha) and Nil (5864 kg DM/ha) tall fescue. The number of tall fescue plants/m2 and their basal diameter was greater for AR542 (35 plants/m2, 7.5 cm diameter) than Nil endophyte tall fescue (28 plants/m2, 6.8 cm diameter). AR542 endophyte tall fescue pastures had fewer weeds, mainly annual grasses, than Nil endophyte pastures throughout the trial. Grazing preference, measured by the number of sheep grazing each plot, and decline in pasture height did not differ between Nil and AR542 tall fescue.en
dc.format.extent259-262en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNew Zealand Grassland Associationen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - New Zealand Grassland Association - http://www.grassland.org.nz/en
dc.rightsCopyright © New Zealand Grassland Association.en
dc.source6th International Symposium on Fungal Endophytes of Grasses Symposiumen
dc.subjecttall fescueen
dc.subjectnovel endophyteen
dc.subjectAR542en
dc.subjectbotanical compositionen
dc.subjectweeden
dc.subjectgrazing preferenceen
dc.titleEffects of MaxP™ endophyte in tall fescue on pasture production and sheep grazing preference, in a dryland environmenten
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitSoil, Plants and Ecological Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/SPES/UNK-SPESen
lu.contributor.unitVice Chancellor's Officeen
dc.subject.anzsrc0703 Crop and Pasture Productionen
dc.relation.isPartOfProceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Fungal Endophytes of Grassesen
pubs.finish-date2007-03-28en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.organisational-group/LU/SPES
pubs.organisational-group/LU/SPES/UNK-SPES
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Vice Chancellor's Office
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.grassland.org.nz/en
pubs.start-date2007-03-25en
dc.publisher.placeDunedin, New Zealanden
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-4165-007X
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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