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dc.contributor.authorMoradi, M.en
dc.contributor.authorBrown, J. A.en
dc.contributor.authorHodge, Miriamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-17T02:34:06Z
dc.date.issued2012-05-25en
dc.identifier.citationMoradi, M., Brown, J.A., & Hodge, M. (2012). Minimal sufficiency in rare populations. Journal of Mathematics and System Science, 2(5), 281-285. doi:10.17265/2159-5291/2012.05.001en
dc.identifier.issn2159-5291en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7016
dc.description.abstractIt is well understood that for conventional survey designs the set of unordered distinct units in a sample is a minimally sufficient statistic. This means that for inferential statistic of the sample, the value of the sampled units rather than the sample design is important. Sampling rare populations presents distinct challenges. Examples of rare populations are in biology with rare and endangered animals where there are only a few remaining individuals, or in social science, with the low incidence of people from an unusually high (or low) income group. Sampling rare populations tends to result in the case that many of the sample units do not contain information on the characteristic of interest (e.g., the rare animal, or people from the unusual income group). For finite rare populations the set of unordered distinct rare-units in a sample is a minimally sufficient statistic. In an example case study of a rare buttercup, the properties of the minimal sufficient estimator are explored. We compare the efficiency of the estimator for the population total based on the minimally sufficient statistic, with the standard estimator for a range of sample sizes. The variance of the minimally sufficient estimator was always smaller than the variance of the sufficient estimator. For rare populations where non-rare units can be distinguished from rare units because they have the same fixed value, the minimal sufficient statistic is the rare units, if any, in the sample.en
dc.format.extent281-285en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDavid Publishingen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - David Publishing - https://doi.org/10.17265/2159-5291/2012.05.001 - http://www.davidpublisher.org/Public/uploads/Contribute/5546d23eb5d74.pdfen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.17265/2159-5291/2012.05.001en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en
dc.subjectrare populationen
dc.subjectfinite populationen
dc.subjectsufficiencyen
dc.subjectminimal sufficiencyen
dc.titleMinimal sufficiency in rare populationsen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.17265/2159-5291/2012.05.001en
dc.subject.anzsrc0104 Statisticsen
dc.subject.anzsrc1699 Other Studies In Human Societyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0607 Plant Biologyen
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Mathematics and System Scienceen
pubs.issue5en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/AGSC
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.davidpublisher.org/Public/uploads/Contribute/5546d23eb5d74.pdfen
pubs.volume2en


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