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dc.contributor.authorCase, Bradley S.en
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Hannah L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-06T23:45:31Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-22en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-29en
dc.identifier.citationCase, B.S., & Buckley, H.L. (2015). Local-scale topoclimate effects on treeline elevations: a country-wide investigation of New Zealand’s southern beech treelines. PeerJ, 2015. doi 10.7717/peerj.1334en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7057
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Case and Buckley.Although treeline elevations are limited globally by growing season temperature, at regional scales treelines frequently deviate below their climatic limit. The cause of these deviations relate to a host of climatic, disturbance, and geomorphic factors that operate atmultiple scales. The ability to disentangle the relative effects of these factors is currently hampered by the lack of reliable topoclimatic data, which describe how regional climatic characteristics are modified by topographic effects in mountain areas. In this study we present an analysis of the combined effects of local- and regional-scale factors on southern beech treeline elevation variability at 28 study areas across New Zealand. We apply a mesoscale atmospheric model to generate local-scale (200 m) meteorological data at these treelines and, from these data, we derive a set of topoclimatic indices that reflect possible detrimental and ameliorative influences on tree physiological functioning. Principal components analysis of meteorological data revealed geographic structure in how study areas were situated in multivariate space along gradients of topoclimate. Random forest and conditional inference tree modelling enabled us to tease apart the relative effects of 17 explanatory factors on local-scale treeline elevation variability. Overall, modelling explained about 50% of the variation in treeline elevation variability across the 28 study areas, with local landform and topoclimatic effects generally outweighing those from regional-scale factors across the 28 study areas. Further, the nature of the relationships between treeline elevation variability and the explanatory variables were complex, frequently non-linear, and consistent with the treeline literature. To our knowledge, this is the first study where model-generated meteorological data, and derived topoclimatic indices, have been developed and applied to explain treeline variation. Our results demonstrate the potential of such an approach for ecological research in mountainous environments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeerJen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - PeerJ - https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1334 - https://peerj.com/articles/1334/en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1334en
dc.rights© 2015 Case and Buckleyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectTAPMen
dc.subjecttreeline elevationen
dc.subjectNothofagaceaeen
dc.subjecttopoclimateen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.subjectscaleen
dc.subjectclimate variabilityen
dc.subjecttopographyen
dc.subjectdisturbanceen
dc.subjectatmospheric modelen
dc.titleLocal-scale topoclimate effects on treeline elevations: A country-wide investigation of New Zealand's southern beech treelinesen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Environmental Managementen
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.1334en
dc.subject.anzsrc0602 Ecologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0501 Ecological Applicationsen
dc.subject.anzsrc06 Biological Sciencesen
dc.subject.anzsrc11 Medical and Health Sciencesen
dc.relation.isPartOfPeerJen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DEM
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://peerj.com/articles/1334/en
pubs.volume2015en
dc.identifier.eissn2167-8359en
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
dc.rights.licenceAttributionen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4360-335X
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-4170-080X


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