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dc.contributor.authorCook, Andrew J.en
dc.contributor.authorFairweather, John R.en
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-16T02:05:38Z
dc.date.issued2005-09en
dc.identifier.issn1170-7682en
dc.identifier.otherResearch Report No. 278en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/729
dc.description.abstractThis research investigated land use and the social and environmental effects of smallholding. The research was designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of smallholders and smallholdings by means of a nationwide survey. To conduct the survey a sample of 3,934 cases was randomly selected from the smallholding population of 0.04 to 40 hectares in size. The survey derived 947 usable responses with a revised response rate of 28 per cent. Analysis of the survey data was undertaken using three categories of smallholder. This analysis showed some differences between the lifestyler, hobby/smallfarmer and farmer/horticulturalist. There were noticeable differences, for example, in size, number of years of residence and amount of farm experience. However, there were no differences in terms of engagement in productive activities such as livestock and plant production. In further analysis it was found that almost all smallholders intend to plant trees for landscaping or commercial purposes. However, the analysis also showed that smallholders do not voluntarily engage in environmental monitoring and environmentally friendly practices to the same extent as other farmers and growers. In addition, the use of, and intentions to use, organic methods were not as prevalent as that for other farmers and growers. Nevertheless, it was also found that smallholders valued the merits of country life including peace and quiet and clean air. In discussion of the results emphasis is given to production and it is shown that while there appears to be high levels of production on some of the smallholdings the result is skewed by a small number of smallholders with high production income, while a sizable proportion did not report any income. Lack of difference between self declared lifestylers and other smallholders is discussed in terms of the common assumption that lifestylers engage less in farming activities. A discussion of environmental impacts predicts a 'greening' of the landscape due to smallholders' intending to plant various tree varieties.en
dc.format.extent1-50en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit. - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/729en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAERU Research Reporten
dc.subjectsmallholdingsen
dc.subjectrural land useen
dc.titleCharacteristics of smallholdings in New Zealand : results from a nationwide surveyen
dc.typeReport
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::370000 Studies in Human Society::370400 Human Geographyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agribusiness and Commerceen
lu.contributor.unit/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFINen
dc.subject.anzsrc140201 Agricultural Economicsen
pubs.confidentialfalseen
pubs.issueNo. 278en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Agribusiness and Commerce/ECONFIN
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/729en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.subtypeInternal Useen


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