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dc.contributor.authorGreer, Glenen
dc.date.accessioned2008-12-16T02:05:42Z
dc.date.issued2005-03en
dc.identifier.issn1170-7682en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/732
dc.description.abstractThe Footrot Gene-marker Test (FGMT) programme has been funded by contributions from the Sustainable Farming Fund and the merino and mid-micron sheep industries to develop a tool for selecting footrot tolerant breeding animals. The research that is the subject of this paper has been conducted to calculate the costs of footrot to those industries and, therefore, the potential benefits from the FGMT programme, and to provide early estimates of the benefits that have been realised to date. It has also examined the level of understanding of the programme in the industry and, therefore, the success of the technology transfer element of the programme.en
dc.format.extent1-53en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit. - http://hdl.handle.net/10182/731en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAERU Research Reporten
dc.subjectfootrot in sheepen
dc.subjectcostsen
dc.subjectFootrot Gene-marker Test (FGMT)en
dc.subjecteconomic benefitsen
dc.titleThe costs of footrot and the impact of the footrot gene-marker test in New Zealand : a report to the Sustainable Farming Funden
dc.typeMonograph
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340201 Agricultural economicsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300900 Land, Parks and Agriculture Management::300901 Farm management, rural management and agribusinessen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
dc.subject.anzsrc1402 Applied Economicsen
pubs.editionResearch Report No. 274en
pubs.notesIncorrect date "March 2004" shown on title pageen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://hdl.handle.net/10182/731en
dc.publisher.placeLincoln, Canterburyen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1478-3486


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