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dc.contributor.authorDoody, D.en
dc.contributor.authorWithers, P. J. A.en
dc.contributor.authorDils, R. M.en
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorSmith, V.en
dc.contributor.authorMcElarney, Y. R.en
dc.contributor.authorDunbar, M.en
dc.contributor.authorDaly, D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-06T03:22:15Z
dc.date.available2016-08-01en
dc.date.issued2016-08en
dc.identifier.citationDoody et al. (2016). Optimizing land use for the delivery of catchment ecosystem services. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 14(6), 325-332. doi 10.1002/fee.1296en
dc.identifier.issn1540-9295en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7436
dc.description.abstract© The Ecological Society of America. Despite widespread implementation of best management practices, sustainable farming is neither practical nor possible in certain locations, where protecting water quality and promoting agricultural production are likely to be incompatible. Some strategic prioritization of land-use options and acceptance of continually degraded waterbodies may be required to ensure optimization of multiple ecosystem services in catchments (also known as watersheds or drainage basins). We examine approaches to prioritization and propose catchment buffering capacity as a concept to manage the pressure–impact relationship between land use and aquatic ecosystems. Catchment buffering capacity can be considered as a continuum of biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological catchment properties that define this relationship. Here, we outline a conceptual framework to assist prioritization: (1) establish a water-quality target, (2) quantify the gap in compliance to achieve the desired target, (3) assess catchment sensitivity to change, and (4) determine the adaptive capacity of catchment communities to reach the target.en
dc.format.extent325-332en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Ecological Society of Americaen
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - The Ecological Society of America - https://doi.org/10.1002/fee.1296 - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fee.1296/abstracten
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/fee.1296en
dc.rights© The Ecological Society of Americaen
dc.subjectland useen
dc.subjectecosystemen
dc.subjectcatchmenten
dc.subjectcatchment buffering capacityen
dc.subjectcatchment prioritizationen
dc.subjectphosphorusen
dc.subjectagricultureen
dc.subjectwater qualityen
dc.subjectwateren
dc.subjectEcologyen
dc.titleOptimizing land use for the delivery of catchment ecosystem servicesen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/fee.1296en
dc.subject.anzsrc050302 Land Capability and Soil Degradationen
dc.subject.anzsrc070101 Agricultural Land Managementen
dc.subject.anzsrc079901 Agricultural Hydrology (Drainage, Flooding, Irrigation, Quality, etc.)en
dc.subject.anzsrc050102 Ecosystem Functionen
dc.relation.isPartOfFrontiers in Ecology and the Environmenten
pubs.issue6en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fee.1296/abstracten
pubs.volume14en
dc.identifier.eissn1540-9309en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3911-4825


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