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dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorNash, D. M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-17T02:31:42Z
dc.date.available2011-11-08en
dc.date.issued2012-05en
dc.identifier.citationMcDowell, R.W., & Nash, D. (2012). A review of the cost-effectiveness and suitability of mitigation strategies to prevent Phosphorus loss from dairy farms in New Zealand and Australia. Journal of Environmental Quality, 41(3), 680-693. doi 10.2134/jeq2011.0041en
dc.identifier.issn1537-2537en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7500
dc.description.abstractThe loss of phosphorus (P) from land to water is detrimental to surface water quality in many parts of New Zealand and Australia. Farming, especially pasture-based dairying, can be a source of P loss, but preventing it requires a range of fully costed strategies because little or no subsidies are available and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies varies with different farm management systems, topography, stream density, and climate. This paper reviews the cost-effectiveness of mitigation strategies for New Zealand and Australian dairy farms, grouping strategies into (i) management (e.g., decreasing soil test P, fencing streams off from stock, or applying low-water-soluble P fertilizers), (ii) amendments (e.g., alum or red mud [Bauxite residue]), and (iii) edge-of-field mitigations (e.g., natural or constructed wetlands). In general, on farm management strategies were the most cost-effective way of mitigating P exports (cost range, $0 to $200 per kg P conserved). Amendments, added to tile drains or directly to surface soil, were often constrained by supply or were labor intensive. Of the amendments examined, red mud was cost effective where cost was off set by improved soil physical properties. Edge-of-field strategies, which remove P from runoff (i.e., wetlands) or prevent runoff (i.e., irrigation runoff recycling systems), were generally the least cost effective, but their benefits in terms of improved overall resource efficiency, especially in times of drought, or their effect on other contaminants like N need to be considered. By presenting a wide range of fully costed strategies, and understanding their mechanisms, a farmer or farm advisor is able to choose those that suit their farm and maintain profitability. Further work should examine the potential for targeting strategies to areas that lose the most P in time and space to maximize the cost-effectiveness of mitigation strategies, quantify the benefits of multiple strategies, and identify changes to land use that optimize overall dairy production, but minimize catchment scale, as versus farm scale, nutrient exports.en
dc.format.extent680-693en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc. - https://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2011.0041 - https://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/jeq/abstracts/41/3/680en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2011.0041en
dc.rightsCopyright © 2012 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.en
dc.subjectphosphorusen
dc.subjectphosphorus lossen
dc.subjectmitigationen
dc.subjectdairy farmen
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectAustraliaen
dc.subjectfertilizeren
dc.subjectsoilen
dc.subjectstreamen
dc.subjectirrigationen
dc.subjectgrazingen
dc.subjecteffluenten
dc.subjectdrainen
dc.subjectpastureen
dc.subjectcropen
dc.subjectwetlanden
dc.subjectAgronomy & Agricultureen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshWater Pollutants, Chemicalen
dc.subject.meshDairyingen
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen
dc.titleA review of the cost-effectiveness and suitability of mitigation strategies to prevent Phosphorus loss from dairy farms in New Zealand and Australiaen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciencesen
dc.identifier.doi10.2134/jeq2011.0041en
dc.subject.anzsrc0703 Crop and Pasture Productionen
dc.subject.anzsrc079902 Fertilisers and Agrochemicals (incl. Application)en
dc.subject.anzsrc079901 Agricultural Hydrology (Drainage, Flooding, Irrigation, Quality, etc.)en
dc.subject.anzsrc040608 Surfacewater Hydrologyen
dc.subject.anzsrc0503 Soil Sciencesen
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Environmental Qualityen
pubs.issue3en
pubs.notesPublished in – Special section: Emerging technologies to remove nonpoint P sources from surface water and groundwateren
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/SOILS
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.publisher-urlhttps://dl.sciencesocieties.org/publications/jeq/abstracts/41/3/680en
pubs.volume41en
dc.identifier.eissn0047-2425en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-3911-4825


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