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dc.contributor.authorGebru, H.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-14T01:58:35Z
dc.date.available2016-11-14T01:58:35Z
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7579
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the fodder productivity of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus palmensis) two experiments were conducted at Lincoln College, Canterbury, New Zealand (latitude 43° 39’S and 172° 28’E; altitude 11 meters), on a fertile Templeton silt loam soil without irrigation or fertiliser. Rainfall during the study ranged from 317 mm in experiment 2 to 348 mm in experiment 1. The first experiment, which was carried out from September 1987 to June 1988, examined the effects of September, December or March cutting on tagasaste total, edible forage and stem yields, and on nitrogen concentration and yield. Tagasaste plants used were 11 months old at the start of the experiment in September 1987 (uncut since establishment in December 1986). In the second experiment, which was conducted from September 1987 to May 1988, edible forage production, nitrogen concentration and yield of tagasaste were compared with five shrub legumes: broom, gorse, Montpellier broom, tree lupin and Russell lupin, and with four conventional pastures: Lucerne, perennial ryegrass, white clover and Nui ryegrass-Huia white clover. Stem dry matter yield, edible forage fraction, and litter production of tagasaste were also compared with the shrub legumes. Total, edible forage and stem yields of the edge plants of the shrubs exceeded those of the experimental plants (middle plants). Edible forage yield of tagasaste edge plants was similar to Montpellier broom and gorse edge plants and higher than broom edge plants. Stem yields of tagasaste, Montpellier borrom and gorse edge plants were similar and less than broom edge plants. It is concluded that edible forage yields up to 1975 gDM/m² during the first 20 months and 860 gDM/m² over 8 months can be obtained from dryland tagasaste. Tagasaste can be cut every 3 months, in September, December and March, without significant reduction in total edible forage and nitrogen yields, but with marked reduction in stem production. Tagasaste edible forage yield is less than Lucerne and gorse, but similar to broom and higher than Montpellier broom, ryegrass, white clover and ryegrass white clover. Considering the total and seasonal edible dry matter production, stem yield, edible fraction, %N and N yield, tagasaste has better characteristics than gorse, broom and Montpellier broom to supply edible fodder of high %N and to narrow feed deficit periods.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College, University of Canterburyen
dc.rights.urihttps://researcharchive.lincoln.ac.nz/page/rights
dc.subjecttagasasteen
dc.subjectChamaecytisus palmensisen
dc.subjectfodder cropsen
dc.subjectforage cropsen
dc.subjectstem yielden
dc.subjectyielden
dc.subjectnitrogen yielden
dc.titleFodder production of tagasaste (Chamaecytisus palmensis)en
dc.typeThesisen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Canterburyen
thesis.degree.levelMastersen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Agricultural Scienceen
lu.thesis.supervisorLucas, R. J.
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Agricultural Sciencesen
dc.rights.accessRightsDigital thesis can be viewed by current staff and students of Lincoln University only. Print copy available for reading in Lincoln University Library. May be available through inter-library loan.en
dc.subject.anzsrc0703 Crop and Pasture Productionen
dc.subject.anzsrc070302 Agronomyen


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