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dc.contributor.authorGreenfield, LG
dc.contributor.authorGregorich, EG
dc.contributor.authorvan Kessel, C
dc.contributor.authorBaldock, JA
dc.contributor.authorBeare, MH
dc.contributor.authorBillings, SA
dc.contributor.authorClinton, PW
dc.contributor.authorCondron, Leo
dc.contributor.authorHill, SJ
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, DW
dc.contributor.authorJanzen, HH
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-17T20:56:51Z
dc.date.available2013-04-30
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.date.submitted2013-04-15
dc.identifier.citationGreenfield et al. (2013). Acid hydrolysis to define a biologically-resistant pool is compromised by carbon loss and transformation. Soil Biology and Biochemistry, 64, 122-126. doi 10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.04.009
dc.identifier.issn0038-0717
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/7694
dc.description.abstractBiologically-resistant carbon (C) comprises the bulk of C in most soils and is often estimated from chemical separation of a soil organic matter (SOM) fraction that is not hydrolysed by strong acid, and exhibits an older radiocarbon age and slower turnover than the whole SOM. Here we examine the effects of acid hydrolysis – the method used to separate the nonhydrolysable C – on the quantity, structure and isotopic makeup of C in pure model carbohydrates and those contained in senescent maize that resemble C inputs to SOM. We demonstrate that significant alterations occur during hydrolysis resulting in C mass losses (up to 75% preferential loss of ¹³C) and de novo synthesis of nonhydrolysable, ¹³C-depleted material dominated by aromatic > alkyl > carbonyl moieties. We infer that similar losses, and transformations of ¹⁴C, would partly explain the greater ages attributed to the chemically resistant C, seriously impairing the use of acid hydrolysis to identify this pool of SOM and that de novo synthesis during hydrolysis has obfuscated the true chemical nature of the nonhydrolysable fraction of SOM.
dc.format.extentpp.122-126
dc.languageen
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.
dc.relationThe original publication is available from Elsevier B.V. - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.04.009 - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071713001417
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.04.009
dc.rightsCrown Copyright © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.subjectacid hydrolysis
dc.subjectcarbon
dc.subject¹³C
dc.subjectresistant pool
dc.subjectsoil organic matter
dc.titleAcid hydrolysis to define a biologically-resistant pool is compromised by carbon loss and transformation
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln University
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Soil and Physical Sciences
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.soilbio.2013.04.009
dc.subject.anzsrc0503 Soil Sciences
dc.subject.anzsrc050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
dc.subject.anzsrc050303 Soil Biology
dc.relation.isPartOfSoil Biology and Biochemistry
pubs.organisational-group|LU
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Agriculture and Life Sciences|SOILS
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group|LU|Research Management Office|QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublished
pubs.publisher-urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0038071713001417
pubs.volume64
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-3082-994X


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