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dc.contributor.authorLough, R. D.
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-21T02:43:31Z
dc.date.available2009-01-21T02:43:31Z
dc.date.issued1985-05
dc.identifier.issn0110-7720
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/786
dc.description.abstractMaize is used primarily for domestic requirements in compound stock food, starch, distilling, breakfast foods, with limited amounts exported. A small area of maize is used as a fodder crop (3813 ha in 1982) for cattle and sheep. Grown in the North Island, maize is susceptible to cool summer temperatures which prevent extensive South Island plantings of high yielding varieties. The versatility of maize in its uses as grain, greenfeed and silage gives it a significant advantage over other crops. Maize exports are small being 22,471 tonnes in 1980/81, returning $3.33m f.o.b.: Iran (56%), Fiji (27%), New Caledonia (9%) Western Samoa (5%), Singapore and Fiji were the major export markets. Imports are small and strictly controlled. Diseases such as southern leaf blight and boil smut being of primary concern. Imports are used as basic seed sources although the New Zealand Starch Company is able to utilise imported maize since it is sterilised during processing. The distribution of maize grains production for the 1981 and 1982 harvest is presented in Table 1. In excess of 99.0 percent of total maize production is concentrated in the North Island with the South Auckland / Bay of Plenty area producing two thirds of the total North Island crop. Sixty one percent of the increased production between 1981 and 1982 can be attributed to an increase in the area of maize planted in the South Auckland / Bay of Plenty districts. Per hectare production has increased from 3.9 tonnes per hectare in 1961 to 9.1 tonnes per hectare in 1982. The increase in per hectare production has partly offset a decline in area which peaked at 28,600 ha in 1977. Much of the increased yield is attributed to improved cultivars. Prior to the late 1960's the hybrid seed production was controlled by the Department of Agriculture, but increases in maize areas led to the involvement of seed firms. Seed merchants now develop, produce and market imported seed hybrids in association with the United States franchise holders. In 1969 southern leaf blight devastated United States maize crops leading to the establishment of the first post quarantine growing area in New Zealand for maize cultivars. This allowed continued cultivar development without the risk of importing exotic diseases.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln College. Agricultural and Economics Research Unit.en
dc.relation.ispartofseriesDiscussion paper (Lincoln College (University of Canterbury). Agricultural and Economics Research Unit) ; no. 91en
dc.subjectmaize productionen
dc.subjectfarmingen
dc.subjectstatisticsen
dc.subjectNorth Islanden
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectsurveysen
dc.titleNorth Island maize production, 1983-84en
dc.typeDiscussion Paperen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340201 Agricultural economicsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340400 Econometrics::340402 Econometric and statistical methodsen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::300000 Agricultural, Veterinary and Environmental Sciences::300300 Horticulture::300302 Plant growth and developmenten
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten


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