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dc.contributor.authorShone, Michael C.en
dc.date.accessioned2009-02-12T04:05:29Z
dc.date.issued2008-12-03en
dc.identifier.citationShone, M. C. (2008). "Tourism, regional development and the 'new regionalism" : the case of the Hurunui District, New Zealand", refereed paper in J. Fountain & K. Moore (Eds.) Re-creating Tourism: Proceedings of the NZTHR Conference, 3-5 Dec, 2008, Hanmer Springs, New Zealand. CD Rom, Lincoln University, New Zealand.en
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-86476-204-7en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/827
dc.description.abstractIn New Zealand, as elsewhere, the tourism sector is used overtly as a tool for regional development. This is based largely on the assumed re-distributive effects of tourism spending and the regional spread of tourist attractions and icons. In addition, tourist visitation and expenditure patterns are held to support social goals around retention of regional (including rural) population and service bases, infrastructure and communications. Given the public-private sector partnership essential to tourism initiation, growth and management, it is hardly surprising that tourism, arguably more than any other sector, is actively supported and encouraged as a tool for regional economic development. This has significant implications for understanding the public sector financial support for tourism, as tourism sits the crossroads of economic theory and social action. This paper reviews the role of public policy over the last twenty years in shaping tourism development in New Zealand, and critiques the movement away from economic neo-liberalism to more recent policy paradigms informed by the ideologies of the New Regionalism. An exploratory study of the Hurunui District (New Zealand) is used to illustrate the way in which local government has, under this ideological shift, turned increasingly to tourism in order to address issues of regional development within their territorial boundaries. This paper concludes by noting that although tourism has a number of features which make it attractive for the implementation of regional development agendas, the multi-scalar attribute of the present-day New Regionalism-inspired policy framework presents a complex and potentially unwieldy framework from the perspective of tourism stakeholders, including public and private sector planners, managers and practitioners.en
dc.format.extent8-8en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherLincoln University. Environmental Society & Design.en
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Lincoln University. Environmental Society & Design.en
dc.sourceNew Zealand Tourism and Hospitality Conference 2008en
dc.subjecttourismen
dc.subjectregional developmenten
dc.subjectpublic policyen
dc.subjectnew regionalismen
dc.subjectHurunui Districten
dc.subjecttourism investmenten
dc.titleTourism, regional development and the 'new regionalism' : the case of the Hurunui District, New Zealanden
dc.typeConference Contribution - Published
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::350000 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services::350500 Tourismen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::340000 Economics::340200 Applied Economics::340213 Economic development and growthen
dc.subject.marsdenFields of Research::360000 Policy and Political Science::360200 Policy and Administration::360201 Public policyen
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Environment, Society and Designen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Tourism, Sport and Societyen
pubs.finish-date2008-12-05en
pubs.notesRefereed paper.en
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Faculty of Environment, Society and Design/DTSS
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.start-date2008-12-03en
dc.publisher.placeLincolnen
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0002-1356-146X
lu.subtypeConference Paperen


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