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dc.contributor.authorTait, Peter R.en
dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Caroline M.en
dc.contributor.authorNugent, Grahamen
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Paulen
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-18T21:13:29Z
dc.date.available2016-12-22en
dc.date.issued2017-03-15en
dc.date.submitted2016-12-18en
dc.identifier.citationTait, P., Saunders, C., Nugent, G., & Rutherford, P. (2017). Valuing conservation benefits of disease control in wildlife: a choice experiment approach to bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand's native forests. Journal of Environmental Management, 189, 142-149. doi:10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.045en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4797en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10182/8899
dc.description.abstractWe assess the non-monetary environmental benefits that accrue incidentally in New Zealand (NZ) from pest management conducted primarily to control an animal disease, bovine tuberculosis (TB). TB is an infectious disease that is one of the world's most serious animal health problems and, in many parts of the developing world, still a major mortality risk for humans. The incidence of TB in New Zealand (NZ) farmed livestock has been reduced progressively over the last 20 years, largely due to extensive and sustained population control of the main wildlife reservoir of disease, the introduced brushtail possum. Possums are also major pests that threaten indigenous forest biodiversity, and so extensive possum control for TB mitigation also incidental benefits conservation, but the extent and public value of this benefit has yet to be quantified. We conducted a choice experiment survey of the NZ public in an effort to value the native forest biodiversity benefits of TB-related possum control. We find strong public support for conservation outcomes consequent to TB-possum control in public native forests. The public place substantial value on the most observable biodiversity benefits of TB possum control, such as improved forest canopies and presence of native birds. The benefits, costs and values of TB-possum control are discussed in relation to the future directives of NZ's TB control programme, which is headed toward first regional and then national level disease eradication.en
dc.format.extent142-149en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relationThe original publication is available from - Elsevier - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.045en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.045en
dc.rights© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en
dc.subjectNew Zealanden
dc.subjectbovine tuberculosisen
dc.subjectpossum controlen
dc.subjectnon-market benefitsen
dc.subjectbiodiversityen
dc.subjectconservation valuesen
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciencesen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Wilden
dc.subject.meshCattleen
dc.subject.meshTrichosurusen
dc.subject.meshTuberculosis, Bovineen
dc.subject.meshConservation of Natural Resourcesen
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirsen
dc.subject.meshPest Controlen
dc.subject.meshPublic Opinionen
dc.subject.meshCost-Benefit Analysisen
dc.subject.meshLivestocken
dc.subject.meshForestsen
dc.subject.meshSurveys and Questionnairesen
dc.titleValuing conservation benefits of disease control in wildlife: A choice experiment approach to bovine tuberculosis management in New Zealand's native forestsen
dc.typeJournal Article
lu.contributor.unitLincoln Universityen
lu.contributor.unitAgribusiness and Economics Research Uniten
lu.contributor.unitFaculty of Agriculture and Life Sciencesen
lu.contributor.unitDepartment of Pest Management and Conservationen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.12.045en
dc.subject.anzsrc070505 Forestry Pests, Health and Diseasesen
dc.subject.anzsrc070504 Forestry Management and Environmenten
dc.subject.anzsrc050202 Conservation and Biodiversityen
dc.relation.isPartOfJournal of Environmental Managementen
pubs.organisational-group/LU
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agribusiness & Economics Research Unit
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Agriculture and Life Sciences/ECOL
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office
pubs.organisational-group/LU/Research Management Office/QE18
pubs.publication-statusPublisheden
pubs.volume189en
dc.identifier.eissn1095-8630en
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0003-1597-7511
lu.identifier.orcid0000-0001-6394-4947


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